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How can talking to your co-workers help you stay connected when you have depression?

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Think about talking to your co-workers. The decision to open up to them or to your boss about your depression is a complicated one. It's your choice. Legally you don't have to tell them anything you don't want to. But some people find that telling certain people at work can be a relief.

Your colleagues or employer may have been confused or concerned about your behavior when you were depressed. You might put them at ease if you feel comfortable explaining the situation to them. And you might feel a lot better knowing that you have support at the office.

SOURCES:

American Psychiatric Association: "Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Patients with Major Depression," 2000.

Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance: "Finding Peace of Mind: Treatment Strategies for Depression and Bipolar Disorder," "Healthy Lifestyles," "Helping a Friend or Family Member with Depression or Bipolar Disorder," "Psychotherapy: How It Works and How It Can Help," "Wellness at Work," "You've Just Been Diagnosed ... What Now?"

Fochtmann, L.  , Winter 2005. Focus

Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario on December 04, 2017

SOURCES:

American Psychiatric Association: "Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Patients with Major Depression," 2000.

Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance: "Finding Peace of Mind: Treatment Strategies for Depression and Bipolar Disorder," "Healthy Lifestyles," "Helping a Friend or Family Member with Depression or Bipolar Disorder," "Psychotherapy: How It Works and How It Can Help," "Wellness at Work," "You've Just Been Diagnosed ... What Now?"

Fochtmann, L.  , Winter 2005. Focus

Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario on December 04, 2017

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How can side effects of antidepressants affect your treatment for depression?

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