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I have seasonal affective disorder (SAD). What can I do on my own to ease winter depression?

ANSWER

If you have seasonal affective disorder (SAD), try these things to ease winter depression:

  • Light therapy. It can be used with talk therapy, antidepressants, and melatonin supplements, which can help synchronize the body clock. Ask your doctor about these.
  • Get sunlight, regular exercise, and social activity.
  • Try a vitamin D supplement. Talk to your doctor about the proper dosage.
  • Don’t overeat. Choose protein and complex carbohydrates over simple carbohydrates such as candy and soda.

SOURCES:

Alan Gelenberg, MD, chair, American Psychiatric Association's Workgroup on Treatment Guidelines for Major Depressive Disorder. Alexander Obolsky, MD, Chicago psychiatrist and assistant professor of clinical psychiatry and behavioral science, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago. Stephen Josephson, PhD, clinical associate professor, Cornell University Medical School and Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, and psychologist, New York, N.Y. Norman Rosenthal, MD, author, psychiatrist and clinical professor of psychiatry, Georgetown University, Washington, D.C. National Institute of Mental Health: "What are the different forms of depression?" Westrin A. 2007: vol. 21: pp.901-909. Al Lewy, MD, PhD, professor of psychiatry, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland. Lewy AJ. May 9, 2006; vol. 103: pp.7414-7419. Golden R. Apr. 2005; vol. 162: pp.656-662.







Winter Blues;CNS Drugs,Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences,American Journal of Psychiatry,

Reviewed by Joseph Goldberg on September 23, 2018

SOURCES:

Alan Gelenberg, MD, chair, American Psychiatric Association's Workgroup on Treatment Guidelines for Major Depressive Disorder. Alexander Obolsky, MD, Chicago psychiatrist and assistant professor of clinical psychiatry and behavioral science, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago. Stephen Josephson, PhD, clinical associate professor, Cornell University Medical School and Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, and psychologist, New York, N.Y. Norman Rosenthal, MD, author, psychiatrist and clinical professor of psychiatry, Georgetown University, Washington, D.C. National Institute of Mental Health: "What are the different forms of depression?" Westrin A. 2007: vol. 21: pp.901-909. Al Lewy, MD, PhD, professor of psychiatry, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland. Lewy AJ. May 9, 2006; vol. 103: pp.7414-7419. Golden R. Apr. 2005; vol. 162: pp.656-662.







Winter Blues;CNS Drugs,Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences,American Journal of Psychiatry,

Reviewed by Joseph Goldberg on September 23, 2018

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