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What types of conflicts can interpersonal therapy address to help with depression?

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Interpersonal therapy is a short-term focused treatment for depression. It addresses interpersonal issues that may be related to and affected by depression. The therapy focuses on 4 main types of problems:

  • Interpersonal disputes or conflicts. These disputes happen in marriages, families, work, school, and with friends.
  • Role transitions. Life changes, such as divorces and job losses.
  • Grief from deaths.
  • Interpersonal deficits. This means lack of social connections and relationships.

SOURCES:

University of Michigan Depression Center: "Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Depression."

National Alliance on Mental Illness: "Depression in Children and Adolescents Fact Sheet."

American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry: "Psychotherapies for Children and Adolescents."

International Society for Interpersonal Therapy: "Interpersonal therapy - An Overview."

Encyclopedia of Mental Disorders: "Interpersonal therapy."

International Society for Interpersonal Therapy: "Interpersonal Therapy in Groups (IPT-G)."

Reviewed by Joseph Goldberg on February 08, 2017

SOURCES:

University of Michigan Depression Center: "Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Depression."

National Alliance on Mental Illness: "Depression in Children and Adolescents Fact Sheet."

American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry: "Psychotherapies for Children and Adolescents."

International Society for Interpersonal Therapy: "Interpersonal therapy - An Overview."

Encyclopedia of Mental Disorders: "Interpersonal therapy."

International Society for Interpersonal Therapy: "Interpersonal Therapy in Groups (IPT-G)."

Reviewed by Joseph Goldberg on February 08, 2017

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How can interpersonal therapy (IPT) for depression work in group setting?

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