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Can diabetes put me at risk for falling more often?

ANSWER

Sudden falls are a serious concern among older adults. Decreased vision, certain medicines, balance problems, and more can make you take a tumble. Diabetes also puts you at risk for falls. It can damage nerves in your feet, a condition called peripheral neuropathy. It can cause pain, tingling, sensitivity, or numbness in your feet. This can make it hard to sense where your feet are, which can cause you to easily trip or fall.

From: 6 Health Problems to Watch For WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Diabetes Association: “Living Healthy with Diabetes: A Guide for Adults 55 and Up.”

Kirkman, S. , December 2012. Diabetes Care

Cleveland Clinic: “Aging and Your Eyes.”

American Diabetes Association: “Eye Care,” “Diabetes and Oral Health Problems,” “Balance Training Helps Prevent Falls,” “Peripheral Neuropathy,” “Flu and Pneumonia Shots.”

NIH Senior Health: “Gum (Periodontal) Disease.”

American Dental Association: “Preventing Periodontal Disease.”

National Institute on Aging: “Falls and Fractures.”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Sexual and Urologic Problems of Diabetes.”

CDC: “Flu and People with Diabetes,” “What You Should Know and Do this Flu Season if You Are 65 Years and Older,” “People at High Risk of Developing Flu-Related Complications.”

Alzheimer’s Association: “Diabetes and Cognitive Decline,” “Alzheimer’s Disease and Type 2 Diabetes.”

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on February 18, 2018

SOURCES:

American Diabetes Association: “Living Healthy with Diabetes: A Guide for Adults 55 and Up.”

Kirkman, S. , December 2012. Diabetes Care

Cleveland Clinic: “Aging and Your Eyes.”

American Diabetes Association: “Eye Care,” “Diabetes and Oral Health Problems,” “Balance Training Helps Prevent Falls,” “Peripheral Neuropathy,” “Flu and Pneumonia Shots.”

NIH Senior Health: “Gum (Periodontal) Disease.”

American Dental Association: “Preventing Periodontal Disease.”

National Institute on Aging: “Falls and Fractures.”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Sexual and Urologic Problems of Diabetes.”

CDC: “Flu and People with Diabetes,” “What You Should Know and Do this Flu Season if You Are 65 Years and Older,” “People at High Risk of Developing Flu-Related Complications.”

Alzheimer’s Association: “Diabetes and Cognitive Decline,” “Alzheimer’s Disease and Type 2 Diabetes.”

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on February 18, 2018

NEXT QUESTION:

Is there anything I can do to prevent myself from falling if I have diabetes?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

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