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How can someone prevent a stroke?

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If you have diabetes and your doctor suspects your arteries are hardened, he or she may suggest diet and lifestyle changes -- along with medicines -- to prevent the blockages that lead to stroke. Other ways to lower your odds of a stroke include:

  • Don't smoke.
  • Control your blood sugar level.
  • Stay at a healthy weight.
  • Exercise regularly.
  • Get your cholesterol checked (especially your LDL, or "bad," cholesterol). The target should be an LDL level of less than 100 mg/dl. Your doctor may suggest changes to your diet to help get the numbers down.
  • Limit the amount of alcohol you drink. The guidelines are no more than one drink per day for women and two drinks a day for men.
  • Have your blood pressure checked. Your doctor will tell you how to get it under control it if it’s high.
  • Take preventive medicines if your doctor prescribes them.
  • Take daily aspirin if prescribed by your doctor. Some people with diabetes can benefit from low doses of aspirin (81 mg - 325 mg a day) to prevent heart disease.

SOURCES: 

The Department of Endocrinology at The Cleveland Clinic. 

The Cleveland Clinic Heart and Vascular Institute. 

American Diabetes Association The National Institutes for Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease.  

Sacco, R. 2006. Stroke,

Vermeer, S. , 2006.  Stroke

Koren-Morag, N, 2005. Stroke,

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on January 17, 2017

SOURCES: 

The Department of Endocrinology at The Cleveland Clinic. 

The Cleveland Clinic Heart and Vascular Institute. 

American Diabetes Association The National Institutes for Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease.  

Sacco, R. 2006. Stroke,

Vermeer, S. , 2006.  Stroke

Koren-Morag, N, 2005. Stroke,

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on January 17, 2017

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Is there anything I can do to prevent stroke if I have diabetes?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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