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How can someone prevent an insulin overdose?

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Try these things to prevent an overdose:

  • Keep a consistent schedule. It’ll make it much easier for you to stay on track.
  • Eat something at every mealtime. Even if you're not hungry, have some bread, a glass of skim milk, or a small serving of fruit. Never skip meals when you've taken insulin.
  • Be prepared. Expect that you'll have insulin complications at some point. Pack hard candies in your bag and your partner's. Keep some in the car and in your travel bag, too.
  • Make sure friends and family know the way you react to hypoglycemia. It’ll help them take action if your low blood sugar levels make you confused.
  • Wear a medical alert bracelet. Make sure it says you use insulin.

From: How to Handle an Insulin Overdose WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Diabetes Association: "About Insulin and Other Drugs;" "Hypoglycemia;" "Ketoacidosis;" and "Hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic syndrome."

The DCCT Research Group. 1991. American Journal of Medicine,

Meneilly G. , 1994. Diabetes

Levy C. 1998. Diabetes Care,

Korzon-Burakowska A. 1998. Diabetes Care,

Familydoctor.org: "Diabetes: Why You Need Insulin and How to Use It."

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on March 25, 2018

SOURCES:

American Diabetes Association: "About Insulin and Other Drugs;" "Hypoglycemia;" "Ketoacidosis;" and "Hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic syndrome."

The DCCT Research Group. 1991. American Journal of Medicine,

Meneilly G. , 1994. Diabetes

Levy C. 1998. Diabetes Care,

Korzon-Burakowska A. 1998. Diabetes Care,

Familydoctor.org: "Diabetes: Why You Need Insulin and How to Use It."

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on March 25, 2018

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What should you do if you have an insulin overdose?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

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