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How can you manage your medications for diabetes?

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It can be hard to keep up with your medications while also keeping track of meal planning and other diabetes-related tasks. To stay on top of your day-to-day needs:

  • Make a list of everything you’re taking and what it’s for.
  • Stick to one pharmacy when you fill your prescriptions, so your records are all together.
  • Store meds in a pill organizer to help you remember whether you’ve taken your daily dose or not.
  • Use your phone’s alarm, a timer, or other device to remind you when it’s time to take your dose.
  • Make taking your meds part of your daily routine so it becomes a habit.

SOURCES:

Chau, D. , 2001. Clinical Diabetes

American Diabetes Association: “Diabetes 101.”

American Diabetes Association: “Living Healthy With Diabetes.”

American Diabetes Association: “Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD).”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Diabetes: What You Need to Know As You Age.”

American Geriatrics Society's Health in Aging Foundation: “Diabetes.”

The Fisher Center for Alzheimer's Research Foundation: “Low Blood Sugar May Trigger Dementia in Those With Diabetes.”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Tips for Older Adults With Diabetes.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Five Best Exercises for People With Diabetes.”

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on February 18, 2018

SOURCES:

Chau, D. , 2001. Clinical Diabetes

American Diabetes Association: “Diabetes 101.”

American Diabetes Association: “Living Healthy With Diabetes.”

American Diabetes Association: “Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD).”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Diabetes: What You Need to Know As You Age.”

American Geriatrics Society's Health in Aging Foundation: “Diabetes.”

The Fisher Center for Alzheimer's Research Foundation: “Low Blood Sugar May Trigger Dementia in Those With Diabetes.”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Tips for Older Adults With Diabetes.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Five Best Exercises for People With Diabetes.”

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on February 18, 2018

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How can you eat healthy foods if you have diabetes?

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