PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

How do insulin pumps work?

ANSWER

The insulin pump works non-stop, according to a programmed plan unique to each pump wearer. You can change the amount of insulin delivered.

Between meals and overnights, the pump constantly delivers a small amount of insulin to keep your blood sugar in the target range. This is called the "basal rate." When you eat food, you can program extra insulin -- called a "bolus dose" -- into the pump. You can calculate how much of a bolus dose you need based on the grams of carbohydrates you eat or drink.

When you use an insulin pump, you must check your blood sugar level at least four times a day. You set the doses of your insulin and make adjustments to the dose depending on your diet and exercise plans.

From: What Are Insulin Pumps? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCE:  American Diabetes Association.

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on February 26, 2019

SOURCE:  American Diabetes Association.

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on February 26, 2019

NEXT QUESTION:

Why do doctors like insulin pumps?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.