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How does a blood ketone test work?

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You can take a blood ketone test at home or at your doctor's office. To take the blood sample, the doctor will put a thin needle into a vein in your arm to pull out blood or prick a finger.

You can also use a home meter and blood test strips. Some blood glucose meters test for ketones, too. At home:

  • Insert one of the blood ketone test strips into the meter until it stops
  • Wash your hand with soap and water, and then dry it
  • Prick your finger using the lancing device
  • Place a drop of blood into the hole on the strip
  • Check the result, which the meter will show

SOURCES:

American Association for Clinical Chemistry: "Blood Ketones."

American Diabetes Association: "Checking for Ketones." "DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones."

Joslin Diabetes Center: "Ketone Testing: What You Need to Know."

Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation: "Type 1 Diabetes Facts."

UpToDate: "Patient information: Self-blood glucose monitoring in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)."

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on November 6, 2020

SOURCES:

American Association for Clinical Chemistry: "Blood Ketones."

American Diabetes Association: "Checking for Ketones." "DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones."

Joslin Diabetes Center: "Ketone Testing: What You Need to Know."

Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation: "Type 1 Diabetes Facts."

UpToDate: "Patient information: Self-blood glucose monitoring in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)."

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on November 6, 2020

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What does a urine ketone test show for someone who has diabetes?

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