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How does diabetes-related nerve damage affect your risk of injury during exercise?

ANSWER

The kind of diabetes-related nerve damage your doctor calls peripheral neuropathy can make you lose feeling in your feet and toes. It can also affect your balance and raise your chances of falling. If you have it, try not to run or jump. Choose an exercise that doesn’t impact your joints, like swimming.

Another kind of nerve damage, autonomic neuropathy, can make you faint if you move around too fast.

SOURCES:

Sheri Colberg-Ochs, PhD, professor of exercise science, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA.

American Diabetes Association: “Blood Glucose Control and Exercise,” “Exercising With Diabetes Complications.”

Abate, M. , May 2013. Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome, and Obesity: Targets and Therapy

Buettner, C. , February 2012. American Journal of Medicine

Mansi, I. , July 22, 2013. JAMA Internal Medicine

Joslin Diabetes Center: “Exercising with Diabetes Complications.”

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on May 12, 2018

SOURCES:

Sheri Colberg-Ochs, PhD, professor of exercise science, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA.

American Diabetes Association: “Blood Glucose Control and Exercise,” “Exercising With Diabetes Complications.”

Abate, M. , May 2013. Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome, and Obesity: Targets and Therapy

Buettner, C. , February 2012. American Journal of Medicine

Mansi, I. , July 22, 2013. JAMA Internal Medicine

Joslin Diabetes Center: “Exercising with Diabetes Complications.”

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on May 12, 2018

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Can exercising with diabetes increase your risk of eye problems?

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