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How does fast-acting insulin work to treat type 2 diabetes?

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Fast-acting insulin goes into your system within 30 minutes and works best to control blood sugar during meals and snacks. There's also rapid-acting insulin that starts to work in about half the time, but it doesn't work as long.

Diabetes Care , August 2006.

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: "Insulin, Medicines & Other Diabetes Treatments."

American Diabetes Association: "Medicines," "What Are My Options?" "Other Injectable Medications," Insulin Routines," "Types of Insulin."

Diabetes Teaching Center at the University of California, San Francisco: "Types of Insulin."

Mayo Clinic: "Diseases and Conditions -- Diabetes."

Group Health: "Types of Insulin and How They Work."

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on April 20, 2017

Diabetes Care , August 2006.

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: "Insulin, Medicines & Other Diabetes Treatments."

American Diabetes Association: "Medicines," "What Are My Options?" "Other Injectable Medications," Insulin Routines," "Types of Insulin."

Diabetes Teaching Center at the University of California, San Francisco: "Types of Insulin."

Mayo Clinic: "Diseases and Conditions -- Diabetes."

Group Health: "Types of Insulin and How They Work."

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on April 20, 2017

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How does intermediate-acting insulin work to treat type 2 diabetes?

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