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How is diabetic nephropathy treated?

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Managing blood pressure and blood sugar control are musts to slow down diabetic nephropathy. There are medications available which have been found to slow down the progression of kidney damage. They include:

  • SGLT2 inhibitors including dapagliflozin (Farxiga), which helps control high blood sugar. 
  • Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors can help slow down the progression of kidney damage. Although ACE inhibitors -- including ramipril (Altace), quinapril (Accupril), and lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril) -- are usually used to treat high blood pressure and other medical problems, they are often given to people with diabetes to prevent complications, even if their blood pressure is normal.
  • Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) can often be given instead if you have side effects from taking ACE inhibitors

From: Diabetic Nephropathy WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: 

National Kidney Foundation: “Diabetes and Kidney Disease.” 

American Diabetes Association: “Kidney Disease (Nephropathy).” 

The Kidney Foundation: “Diabetes and Kidney Disease.” 

Gross, J. 2005. Diabetes Care

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on December 29, 2019

SOURCES: 

National Kidney Foundation: “Diabetes and Kidney Disease.” 

American Diabetes Association: “Kidney Disease (Nephropathy).” 

The Kidney Foundation: “Diabetes and Kidney Disease.” 

Gross, J. 2005. Diabetes Care

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on December 29, 2019

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What happens if diabetic nephropathy isn't treated?

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