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How is diabetic retinopathy treated?

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Your doctor may recommend laser photocoagulation. It’s a procedure that seals or destroys growing and leaking blood vessels in the retina. It’s not painful, but it might make it harder for you to see color or to see at night. If your blood vessels leak into your retina and vitreous humor (the jellylike substance that fills the eyeball), you may to have what doctors call a vitrectomy. This procedure removes the blood so you can see better. Without it, you’ll have cloudy vision. Your doctor will tell you if these treatments are right for you.

SOURCES:


National Eye Institute: “Diabetic Retinopathy.”

Diabetes Care: “Diabetic retinopathy is associated with mortality and cardiovascular disease incidence: the EURODIAB prospective complications study.”

American Journal of Epidemiology: “Lower-than-Expected Prevalence and Severity of Retinopathy in an Incident Cohort followed during the First 4-14 Years of Type 1 Diabetes.”

New England Journal of Medicine: “Angiogenic Pathways in Diabetic Retinopathy.”

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on June 22, 2021

SOURCES:


National Eye Institute: “Diabetic Retinopathy.”

Diabetes Care: “Diabetic retinopathy is associated with mortality and cardiovascular disease incidence: the EURODIAB prospective complications study.”

American Journal of Epidemiology: “Lower-than-Expected Prevalence and Severity of Retinopathy in an Incident Cohort followed during the First 4-14 Years of Type 1 Diabetes.”

New England Journal of Medicine: “Angiogenic Pathways in Diabetic Retinopathy.”

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on June 22, 2021

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What can you do to prevent diabetic retinopathy?

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