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How is restless leg syndrome treated?

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Various medications are used to treat restless legs syndrome, including dopamine agents, sleeping aids, anticonvulsants, and pain relievers. Your doctor may also prescribe iron if you have low iron levels.

There are also several medications that treat insomnia, including:

  • Over-the-counter drugs such as antihistamines including diphenhydramine (such as Benadryl). These drugs should be used short term and in conjunction with changes in sleep habits.
  • Medications used to treat sleep problems such as eszopiclone (Lunesta), lemborexant (Dayvigo), suvorexant (Belsomra), zalepion (Sonata), and zolpidem (Ambien).
  • Benzodiazepines are an older type of prescription medicine that cause sedation, muscle relaxation, and can lower anxiety levels. Benzodiazepines that were commonly used for the treatment of insomnia include alprazolam (Xanax), diazapam (Valium), estazolam (ProSom), flurazepam ( Dalmane, Dalmadorm)e, lorazepam (Ativan), temazepam (Restoril), and triazolam (Halcion). 
  • Antidepressants such as nefazadone and very low doses of doxepin (Silenor)..

From: Type 2 Diabetes and Sleep WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: Medscape: "Expert Column -- Sleep Disorders in Diabetes." Yaggi, H.K. , 2006. Nilsson, P. , 2004. Mallon, L. , 2005.



Diabetes CareDiabetes CareDiabetes Care

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson on January 22, 2020

SOURCES: Medscape: "Expert Column -- Sleep Disorders in Diabetes." Yaggi, H.K. , 2006. Nilsson, P. , 2004. Mallon, L. , 2005.



Diabetes CareDiabetes CareDiabetes Care

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson on January 22, 2020

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