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Should I exercise if I have type 1 diabetes?

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Exercise can lower your blood sugar level and your risk for all sorts of problems, like heart disease and stroke. It’s also good for your blood pressure and cholesterol.

Talk with your doctor before you get started, though. She might warn you against some workouts with high-impact moves and heavy lifting. These routines can raise blood sugar.

SOURCES:

National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse: “Your Guide to Diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2;” “Prevent Diabetes Problems: Keep Your Heart and Blood Vessels Healthy;” “Prevent Diabetes Problems: Keep Your Kidneys Healthy;” “Prevent Diabetes Problems: Keep Your Feet Healthy;” “Prevent Diabetes Problems: Keep Your Mouth Healthy;” “Prevent Diabetes Problems: “Keep Your Eyes Healthy;” and “Prevent Diabetes Problems: Keep Your Diabetes under Control.”

American Diabetes Association: “Complications;” “Heart Disease;” “High Blood Pressure;” “Physical Activity is Important;” and “Exercising with Diabetes Complications.”

National Diabetes Education Program: “4 Steps to Manage Your Diabetes for Life.”

American Heart Association: “Cholesterol Abnormalities and Diabetes.”

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on February 9, 2017

SOURCES:

National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse: “Your Guide to Diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2;” “Prevent Diabetes Problems: Keep Your Heart and Blood Vessels Healthy;” “Prevent Diabetes Problems: Keep Your Kidneys Healthy;” “Prevent Diabetes Problems: Keep Your Feet Healthy;” “Prevent Diabetes Problems: Keep Your Mouth Healthy;” “Prevent Diabetes Problems: “Keep Your Eyes Healthy;” and “Prevent Diabetes Problems: Keep Your Diabetes under Control.”

American Diabetes Association: “Complications;” “Heart Disease;” “High Blood Pressure;” “Physical Activity is Important;” and “Exercising with Diabetes Complications.”

National Diabetes Education Program: “4 Steps to Manage Your Diabetes for Life.”

American Heart Association: “Cholesterol Abnormalities and Diabetes.”

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on February 9, 2017

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How can type 1 diabetes affect my feet?

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