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What are diabetes ABCs and what is their role in treatment?

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Diabetes makes you more likely to get conditions that may affect your eyes, nerves, heart, teeth, and more. So, you want to watch your diabetes ABCs:

  • "A" stands for A1c. This test measures your average blood sugar over the past 2 or 3 months. Your goal is to keep your score below 7% without risking low blood sugar. "B" stands for blood pressure. If you have diabetes, you're more likely to get high blood pressure. That can lead to other serious conditions. Get your numbers checked 2 to 4 times each year.
  • "C" stands for cholesterol. Diabetes can also raise your chances of having high cholesterol, which makes heart disease and strokes more likely. Get it tested at least once every year.

From: Strategies to Control Your Diabetes WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Diabetes Association: "Diabetes Statistics," "Medication," "Eye Complications," "Your Health Care Team."

University of Pennsylvania Health System: "Glossary of Key Terms."

Utah Department of Health: "Your A1C Number -- Planning for Tomorrow," "Is Your Diabetes Control on Target?"

American Academy of Family Physicians: "Diabetes: Preventing Diabetic Complications."

Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario on December 27, 2017

SOURCES:

American Diabetes Association: "Diabetes Statistics," "Medication," "Eye Complications," "Your Health Care Team."

University of Pennsylvania Health System: "Glossary of Key Terms."

Utah Department of Health: "Your A1C Number -- Planning for Tomorrow," "Is Your Diabetes Control on Target?"

American Academy of Family Physicians: "Diabetes: Preventing Diabetic Complications."

Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario on December 27, 2017

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