PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What are the main risk factors for type 1 diabetes?

ANSWER

Type 1 diabetes usually starts in childhood. Your pancreas stops making insulin. You have type 1 diabetes for life. The main things that lead to it are:

  • Family history. If you have relatives with diabetes, chances are strong you'll get it, too. Anyone who has a mother, father, sister, or brother with type 1 diabetes should get checked. A simple blood test can diagnose it.
  • Diseases of the pancreas. They can slow its ability to make insulin.
  • Infection or illness. Some infections and illnesses, mostly rare ones, can damage your pancreas.

From: What Increases My Risk of Diabetes? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Diabetes Association: "Diabetes Risk Calculator;" "The Dangerous Toll of Diabetes;" and "Diabetes Statistics."

National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse: "Am I at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes?"

MedicineNet.com: "Diabetes: Preventing Type 2 Diabetes."

Simpson, K. and Creehan, P. The Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses/Lippincott, 2001. Perinatal Nursing,

Mayo Clinic: "Gestational Diabetes: Risk Factors."

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on December 25, 2018

SOURCES:

American Diabetes Association: "Diabetes Risk Calculator;" "The Dangerous Toll of Diabetes;" and "Diabetes Statistics."

National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse: "Am I at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes?"

MedicineNet.com: "Diabetes: Preventing Type 2 Diabetes."

Simpson, K. and Creehan, P. The Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses/Lippincott, 2001. Perinatal Nursing,

Mayo Clinic: "Gestational Diabetes: Risk Factors."

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on December 25, 2018

NEXT QUESTION:

What are the main things that lead to type 1 diabetes?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

"ALEXA, ASK WEBMD"

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

    Other Answers On: