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What are the symptoms of diabetic enteropathy?

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Diabetes-related damage to nerves in the intestines causes the food you eat to slow down or stop there as your body processes it. That leads to constipation, and creates a breeding ground for unhealthy bacteria. As a result, you might have diarrhea (or a combination or constipation and diarrhea, which is the most common symptom of enteropathy).

Stool might leak from your rectum, and you may find it hard to control bowel movements. The problem may get worse after you eat.

SOURCES:

American Family Physician: “Gastrointestinal Complications of Diabetes.”

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Gastroparesis.”

World Journal of Diabetes: “Gastrointestinal complications of diabetes mellitus.”

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Fatty Liver Disease (Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis).” 

American Diabetes Association: Diabetes Forecast: “Fatty Liver and Type 2 Diabetes.”

Endocrine Reviews: “Diabetes and nonalcoholic Fatty liver disease: a pathogenic duo.”

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on November 14, 2018

SOURCES:

American Family Physician: “Gastrointestinal Complications of Diabetes.”

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Gastroparesis.”

World Journal of Diabetes: “Gastrointestinal complications of diabetes mellitus.”

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Fatty Liver Disease (Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis).” 

American Diabetes Association: Diabetes Forecast: “Fatty Liver and Type 2 Diabetes.”

Endocrine Reviews: “Diabetes and nonalcoholic Fatty liver disease: a pathogenic duo.”

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on November 14, 2018

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