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What causes eye problems in people with diabetes?

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Over time, high blood sugar damages the walls of the small blood vessels in the eye, altering their structure and function. As part of this condition, called diabetic retinopathy, these vessels may thicken, leak, develop clots, close off, or grow balloon-like defects called microaneurysms. Often, fluid builds up in the part of the retina used in tasks such as reading. This condition is called macular edema. In advanced cases, the retina loses its blood supply and grows new, but defective, vessels. These fragile vessels can bleed and cause more problems, including glaucoma.

SOURCE:

American Diabetes Association.

American Academy of Ophthalmology.

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on January 21, 2017

SOURCE:

American Diabetes Association.

American Academy of Ophthalmology.

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on January 21, 2017

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How will my opthalmologist check for eye problems if I have diabetes?

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