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What do the results of blood ketone test mean for someone who has diabetes?

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Ketone blood test results read as follows:

  • Less than 0.6 = normal
  • 0.6 - 1.0 = slightly high
  • 1.0 - 3.0 = moderately high
  • Higher than 3.0 = very high Write down your results on a chart or in a journal. Then, you can track your levels over time. Slightly high levels could mean that ketones have started to build up in your body. You might have missed an insulin shot. Take it as soon as you can and check again in a few hours. Moderate to high levels mean you might have DKA. Call your doctor or go to the emergency room right away if they are very high.

SOURCES:

American Association for Clinical Chemistry: "Blood Ketones."

American Diabetes Association: "Checking for Ketones." "DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones."

Joslin Diabetes Center: "Ketone Testing: What You Need to Know."

Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation: "Type 1 Diabetes Facts."

UpToDate: "Patient information: Self-blood glucose monitoring in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)."

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on November 6, 2020

SOURCES:

American Association for Clinical Chemistry: "Blood Ketones."

American Diabetes Association: "Checking for Ketones." "DKA (Ketoacidosis) & Ketones."

Joslin Diabetes Center: "Ketone Testing: What You Need to Know."

Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation: "Type 1 Diabetes Facts."

UpToDate: "Patient information: Self-blood glucose monitoring in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)."

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on November 6, 2020

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How can I bring down my ketone levels if I have diabetes?

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