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What drugs are used to treat type 2 diabetes?

ANSWER

Drugs for type 2 diabetes work in different ways to bring blood sugar levels back to normal. They include:

�Drugs that increases insulin production

�Drugs that decrease sugar absorption by the intestines

�Drugs that improve how the body uses insulin

�Drugs that ease sugar production raise insulin resistance

�Drugs that raise insulin production by the pancreas or its blood levels and ease sugar production from the liver

�Drugs that block your kidney from reabsorbing glucose and help you pee more out.

�An injectable synthetic hormone. It helps lower blood sugar after meals in people with diabetes who use insulin. Some pills contain more than one type of medication.

SOURCES: 

News release, FDA. 

American Family Physician. 

National Diabetes Education Program. 

American Diabetes Association. 

Clinical Diabetes Journal. 

WebMD Health News: "FDA Restricts Use of Diabetes Drug Avandia." 

News release, FDA: '' Actos (pioglitazone): Ongoing Safety Review - Potential Increased Risk of Bladder Cancer."

News release, FDA.

Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario on November 7, 2019

SOURCES: 

News release, FDA. 

American Family Physician. 

National Diabetes Education Program. 

American Diabetes Association. 

Clinical Diabetes Journal. 

WebMD Health News: "FDA Restricts Use of Diabetes Drug Avandia." 

News release, FDA: '' Actos (pioglitazone): Ongoing Safety Review - Potential Increased Risk of Bladder Cancer."

News release, FDA.

Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario on November 7, 2019

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How can my eating habits help my diabetes?

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