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What is the future of continuous glucose monitor (CGM)?

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Scientists are testing new and better kinds of CGM systems in clinical trials. The technology is also a key part of researchers’ efforts to build an artificial pancreas, which could mimic the body’s natural process of controlling insulin.

SOURCES:

American Diabetes Association.

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Continuous Glucose Monitoring.”

John Hopkins Diabetes Guide: “Continuous Glucose Monitoring Systems.”

Battelino, T. April 2011. Diabetes Care,

U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

American Diabetes Association: “Developing New Technology for Continuous Glucose Monitoring.”

Annals of Internal Medicine, September 2012.

News Release, Dexcom.

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on April 29, 2017

SOURCES:

American Diabetes Association.

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Continuous Glucose Monitoring.”

John Hopkins Diabetes Guide: “Continuous Glucose Monitoring Systems.”

Battelino, T. April 2011. Diabetes Care,

U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

American Diabetes Association: “Developing New Technology for Continuous Glucose Monitoring.”

Annals of Internal Medicine, September 2012.

News Release, Dexcom.

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on April 29, 2017

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What is a continuous glucose monitor?

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