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Why is too much glucose in the bloodstream bad?

ANSWER

Too much glucose in your bloodstream for a long period of time can damage the vessels that carry oxygen-rich blood to your organs. High blood sugar can increase your risk for:

People with diabetes need to test their blood sugar often. Exercise, diet, and medicine can help keep blood glucose in a healthy range and prevent these complications.

  • Heart disease, heart attack, and stroke
  • Kidney disease
  • Nerve damage
  • Eye disease called retinopathy

From: What Is Glucose? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Diabetes Association: "The Liver's Role: How It Processes Fats and Carbs."

American Foundation for the Blind: "What is the Difference Between Hyperglycemia and Hypoglycemia?"

Group Health: "How Our Bodies Turn Food Into Energy."

Insel, P. 2004. Nutrition,

Joslin Diabetes Center: "Goals for Blood Glucose Control," "High Blood Glucose: What it Means and How to Treat it."

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: "Insulin Resistance and Prediabetes," "Your Guide to Diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2."

NCBI: "Molecular Biology of the Cell, 4th Edition."

UCSF: "The Liver & Blood Sugar."

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on August 13, 2016

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

SOURCES:

American Diabetes Association: "The Liver's Role: How It Processes Fats and Carbs."

American Foundation for the Blind: "What is the Difference Between Hyperglycemia and Hypoglycemia?"

Group Health: "How Our Bodies Turn Food Into Energy."

Insel, P. 2004. Nutrition,

Joslin Diabetes Center: "Goals for Blood Glucose Control," "High Blood Glucose: What it Means and How to Treat it."

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: "Insulin Resistance and Prediabetes," "Your Guide to Diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2."

NCBI: "Molecular Biology of the Cell, 4th Edition."

UCSF: "The Liver & Blood Sugar."

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on August 13, 2016

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

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