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Why might my blood sugar be high even after taking insulin?

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There are other possible causes of your high blood sugar, such as insulin resistance, which may run in your family. That's when your body doesn't respond as well as it should to the insulin it makes. Or you may be taking a drug for another health problem that keeps your body from using it well.

How you use insulin can also matter. If you give yourself shots in the same place over and over, for instance, that area may scar, which can affect how your body absorbs the hormone. It helps to change spots or use an insulin pump.

Some people also take less insulin than they should. It might be because they're afraid of low blood sugar, or they're nervous about needles. You might feel more comfortable by slowly increasing your insulin dose. Consider an insulin pump or pen, if you don't like needles.

Whatever the cause of your blood sugar highs, work closely with your doctor to find a solution. And always talk with him before you make any changes in your insulin dose.

From: When Insulin Isn't Enough WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Diabetes Association: "Blood Glucose Control and Exercise," "About Our Meal Plans," "Stress," "What Are My Options?"

Diabetes Forecast: "How About Post-Meal Insulin?" "New Medications for People with Type 1?"

Michael German, MD, clinical director, Diabetes Center; director, UCSF NIH Diabetes Research Center, University of California, San Francisco.

Joslin Diabetes Center: "Diet and Diabetes: A Personalized Approach."

NIH National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: "What I need to know about Physical Activity and Diabetes," "What I need to know about Diabetes Medicines."

Raccah, D.  , July 2008. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism

Sethu K. Reddy, MD, chief of adult diabetes, Joslin Diabetes Center, Harvard Medical School.

UCSF Diabetes Education Online: "Metformin," "Amylin Analog Treatment," "Incretin Based Treatments," "High Blood Sugar FAQs."

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on December 03, 2018

SOURCES:

American Diabetes Association: "Blood Glucose Control and Exercise," "About Our Meal Plans," "Stress," "What Are My Options?"

Diabetes Forecast: "How About Post-Meal Insulin?" "New Medications for People with Type 1?"

Michael German, MD, clinical director, Diabetes Center; director, UCSF NIH Diabetes Research Center, University of California, San Francisco.

Joslin Diabetes Center: "Diet and Diabetes: A Personalized Approach."

NIH National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: "What I need to know about Physical Activity and Diabetes," "What I need to know about Diabetes Medicines."

Raccah, D.  , July 2008. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism

Sethu K. Reddy, MD, chief of adult diabetes, Joslin Diabetes Center, Harvard Medical School.

UCSF Diabetes Education Online: "Metformin," "Amylin Analog Treatment," "Incretin Based Treatments," "High Blood Sugar FAQs."

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on December 03, 2018

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Why is it important to make healthy lifestyle choices if you have diabetes?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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