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  • Question 1/12

    When we say "blood sugar," we're talking about:

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    When we say "blood sugar," we're talking about:

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    This simple sugar is the main source of energy for all the cells in your body. As your body digests the food you eat, glucose gets absorbed into your blood, which delivers it to your cells like a constantly moving buffet line. The term is often used as shorthand for "blood glucose level," or how much glucose is in your bloodstream (measured in milligrams per deciliter, mg/dL) at any given moment.

  • Question 1/12

    Too much sugar in your blood is called:

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    Too much sugar in your blood is called:

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    "Hyper" means "over" or "excess," and glycemia means "glucose in the blood." When your pancreas can't make enough insulin (the hormone that helps your cells use glucose), or if insulin doesn't work the way it should in your body, glucose builds up in your blood.

  • Question 1/12

    Poor sleep can throw off your blood sugar.

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    Poor sleep can throw off your blood sugar.

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    You use glucose faster during certain parts of your sleep cycle and more slowly during others. Don't get enough good-quality sleep, and you'll mess up that fast-vs.-slow balance. Some studies suggest that, down the road, this can put you in danger of developing type 2 diabetes. 

  • Question 1/12

    Your blood sugar should be less than ____ mg/dL when you wake up in the morning.

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    Your blood sugar should be less than ____ mg/dL when you wake up in the morning.

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    Your fasting blood sugar is one way your doctor can tell how well your body uses glucose. If you're in the 100-125 mg/dL range after not eating overnight, you likely have prediabetes. If it's above 125 mg/dL, you could have diabetes.

  • Question 1/12

    When your blood sugar gets too low, which part of your body will notice it first?

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    When your blood sugar gets too low, which part of your body will notice it first?

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    You can't think straight without glucose. That's why low blood sugar symptoms typically begin with a headache, serious munchies, vision problems, and weakness. Things can get worse fast: Without a blood sugar bump, you can start to get confused, have seizures, or even slip into a coma.

  • Question 1/12

    Which of these will raise your blood sugar level the fastest?

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    Which of these will raise your blood sugar level the fastest?

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    Carbs boost blood sugar quickly, while protein, fat, and fiber offset their effect. The glycemic index (GI) scores foods by how fast they raise blood glucose. For example, the GI of a baked potato is about double that of potato chips. But you also have to consider serving size. While a cup of OJ and an orange have roughly the same GI, the raw fruit has much less of an impact on your blood sugar.

  • Question 1/12

    High blood glucose levels can make you:

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    High blood glucose levels can make you:

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    Your kidneys make it their mission to flush out extra glucose. They do this by making more urine, which means more trips to the bathroom. You may also feel thirsty from losing so much liquid. Very high blood sugar levels can also make you lose weight even though you're eating, or feel tired all the time since your cells can't get fuel.

  • Question 1/12

    Does someone with diabetes have to test their blood sugar every day?

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    Does someone with diabetes have to test their blood sugar every day?

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    How often you should check your number depends on a lot of things, including the type of diabetes you have, the kind of medicine you take for it, your overall health, and how much exercise you've gotten recently. Typically, people with type 1 diabetes test at least 4 times a day or use a continuous glucose monitor. But with type 2 diabetes, you may only have to test twice a day, if at all.

  • Question 1/12

    How does smoking affect blood sugar?

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    How does smoking affect blood sugar?

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    Nicotine changes chemical processes in your cells so they don't respond to insulin. That means your cells can't get the glucose out of your blood, and your blood sugar goes up. The chemical boosts insulin resistance in other ways, too.

    If you take insulin for diabetes, nicotine can also cause severe low blood sugar, although scientists aren't sure exactly how. Regardless, smoking is definitely not a good way to manage your diabetes.

  • Question 1/12

    Where does your body store glucose?

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    Where does your body store glucose?

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    Once your body uses what it needs after a meal, your liver takes the leftover glucose out of your blood, turns it into glycogen, and hangs on to it. When your blood sugar level dips -- perhaps between meals or after exercise -- your liver can turn its glycogen stash back into glucose and release it into your blood to help bring you back up to speed.

  • Question 1/12

    Worrying about your blood sugar will lower it.

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    Worrying about your blood sugar will lower it.

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    Stress can make your body feel like it's under attack. This turns on your "fight or flight" response, which floods your bloodstream with hormones that help get your cells ready to fire up. They dial back when the threat is over. When stress doesn't let up, your body may stay primed with higher levels of glucose, expecting that your cells could need more energy at any moment.

  • Question 1/12

    Over time, high blood sugar levels could cause:

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    Over time, high blood sugar levels could cause:

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    People with poorly controlled blood sugar are more likely to have teeth and gum problems. And serious gum disease can raise your blood sugar.

    Other complications from long-term high blood sugar include kidney and nerve damage, cataracts and other eye problems, bone and joint issues, heart disease, trouble with your blood vessels, and skin infections.

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Sources | Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler, MD on July 19, 2019 Medically Reviewed on July 19, 2019

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler, MD on
July 19, 2019

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

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SOURCES:

MedlinePlus: "Blood Sugar," "Hyperglycemia."

KidsHealth: "When Blood Sugar is Too High," "What is Hypoglycemia?" "Keeping Track of Your Blood Sugar"

Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine: "Does lack of sleep cause diabetes?"

Mayo Clinic: "Diabetes: Tests and diagnosis," "Blood sugar testing: Why, when and how," "Hyperglycemia in diabetes: Complications."

Harvard Health Publications: "Glycemic index and glycemic load for 100+ foods."

Diabetes: "Novel and Reversible Mechanisms of Smoking-Induced Insulin Resistance in Humans."

Trends in Endocrinology & Metabolism: "The endocrine effects of nicotine and cigarette smoke."

PubMed Health: "How does the liver work?"

American Diabetes Association: "Stress," "Diabetes and Oral Health Problems."

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