S.M.A.R.T. Weight Loss With Type 2 Diabetes

Make losing weight with diabetes easier by setting S.M.A.R.T. goals.

S.M.A.R.T. stands for Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, and Time-bound. When your goals are S.M.A.R.T., it will be simpler to stay on track with your diet.

To help manage your diabetes, you need to spread carbs out more evenly throughout the day. So, for example, a S.M.A.R.T. goal could be “I will eat a breakfast containing 45 grams of carbohydrates every day for the next 2 weeks.”

Here’s the S.M.A.R.T. breakdown:

Specific: targeted to breakfast

Measurable: 45 grams, every day

Attainable: Breakfasts with about 45 grams of carbs are very doable. A few options:

  • 1 cup cooked oatmeal (32 grams), 1/2 medium banana (13 grams), a hard-boiled egg, black coffee
  • 2 scrambled eggs, 1 small whole wheat pita (15 grams), 1 orange (18 grams), 1 cup 1% milk (14 grams)
  • 3 rye crispbreads (24 grams), 1/2 cup nonfat cottage cheese (5 grams), 1 cup of blackberries (15 grams)

Relevant: Spreading carbs out is relevant because it helps you curb hunger, so you don’t overeat. To hit 45 grams, you have to plan to eat protein and fat in addition to carbs at a meal. A piece of toast with an egg, for instance, will keep you feeling full longer than two slices of toast with jam. When you’re more satisfied, you’re likely to eat less overall.

Time-bound: This goal will be your focus for 2 weeks. At the end of that time, you can decide if you want to do it again or set a different goal.

Why It Works

Setting S.M.A.R.T. goals helps keep big projects, like losing weight or managing blood sugar, from being overwhelming.

Your steps for success are clearly spelled out so that you know when you’ve met the goal.

The biggest payoff comes from turning short-term goals into long-lasting, healthy habits.

WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by Michael Dansinger, MD on April 18, 2018

Sources

SOURCES:

Shilts, M. American Journal of Health Promotion, November/December 2004.

Latham, G. Organizational Dynamics, August 2003.

Bodenheimer, T. Patient Education and Counseling, August 2009.

Self Nutrition Data.

 

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