The Eat-Clean Diet Review

The Promise

Forget counting calories. Your ticket to a lean, healthy body is “eating clean,” says Tosca Reno, author of The Eat-Clean Diet series.

She means eating foods -- like lean protein, good-for-you carbs and fats, fresh fruits, and vegetables -- six times a day in the right amounts. Do that, drink lots of water, and exercise regularly, and Reno says you’ll turn your sluggish metabolism into a fat-burning machine.

Dedicate yourself to the clean eating lifestyle, and you’ll lose about 3 pounds a week, Reno says. The benefits go beyond weight loss. You'll stay healthy and have more energy. Your eyes will look bright and alert. Your teeth and gums will be healthier. Your skin will glow. Oh, and did we mention you won't be hungry?

“When you Eat Clean, the benefits are visible (and perceptible to you on the inside, too) from the top of your head to the tips of your toes,” Reno writes in The Eat-Clean Diet Recharged!

The Eat-Clean philosophy is that nutrition is far more important than exercise or genetics in shaping our bodies.

Does It Work?

The eating-clean lifestyle has some good points. It's a balanced diet that focuses on whole grains, fruits, vegetables, fats, and protein. It also encourages you to control portion sizes. And it doesn't ban any food groups.

But the plan also recommends taking supplements and even questionable medical treatments that draw warnings from some experts.

What You Can and Can’t Eat

The Eat-Clean principles are:

  • Eat six small meals a day.
  • Eat breakfast every day, within an hour of getting up.
  • Eat lean protein and complex carbohydrates at every meal.
  • Have two or three servings of healthy fats every day.
  • Get fiber, vitamins, nutrients, and enzymes from fresh fruits and vegetables.
  • Control your portions.
  • Drink 2 to 3 liters of water (about 13 8-ounce cups) every day.

The foods to avoid:

  • Overprocessed foods, especially white flour and sugar
  • Artificial sweeteners
  • Sugary beverages, such as soda and juice
  • Alcohol
  • Foods with chemical additives like food dyes and sodium nitrite
  • Foods with preservatives
  • Artificial foods, such as processed cheese slices
  • Saturated fats and trans fats
  • Anti-foods -- calorie-dense foods with no nutritional value

Continued

Level of Effort: Medium

You must follow the diet’s principles to be successful, but there is wiggle room.

Limitations: You have some flexibility. If you don’t like foods in Reno’s menu plans, you can replace them with others from the same food group.

Cooking and shopping: Planning can save you time grocery shopping, Reno says. Make a shopping list and stick to it. Keep in mind that foods without preservatives may not keep long, meaning more frequent trips to the grocery store. As for meal prep, a complete meal on this plan can be as simple as nuts and a piece of fruit.

Packaged foods or meals: None required.

In-person meetings: None.

Exercise: Strength training and cardiovascular exercise round out the Eat-Clean program. To lose weight, Reno recommends five or six sessions of cardio weekly, for 30 to 45 minutes each. If you’re new to strength training, start with light weights and longer sets.

Does It Allow for Dietary Restrictions or Preferences?

Reno says the Eat-Clean lifestyle is flexible and adapts to your dietary needs. Just follow the principles, she says, and eat the foods you can.

Vegetarians and vegans: This diet works for you. Eating clean doesn’t require eating meat, eggs, or other animal products.

What Else You Should Know

Cost: None beyond shopping for your food.

Support: There are no meetings or coaches. But you can sign up for the Eat-Clean Diet newsletter, watch inspirational videos, and connect with the Eat-Clean community online.

WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by Christine Mikstas, RD, LD on February 05, 2017

Sources

SOURCES:

Reno, T. The Eat-Clean Diet Recharged, Robert Kennedy Publishing, 2009.

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: “The Eat-Clean Diet Recharged.”

Science-Based Medicine: “Should you be Eating Clean?”

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