Health Benefits of Aloe Vera Juice

There are hundreds of aloe plants, but aloe vera is unique in its ability to help you inside and out. Aloe vera is the one edible form of aloe. The aloe vera plant is native to the Arabian peninsula, but it grows throughout the world. This shrubby, pointy plant has been cultivated for its soothing gel for thousands of years.

Aloe vera gel isn’t just good for skin issues. It can be blended with water to create aloe vera juice, which is full of nutrients. 

Health Benefits

The nutrients found in aloe vera juice can provide some health benefits. Beta-carotene is a yellow-red pigment that's found in aloe vera plants. It acts as an antioxidant that can help support eye health, including retinal and corneal function.

Relieves Heartburn

Also known as acid reflux, heartburn is a painful condition that involves acid leaving the stomach and traveling up the esophagus. A recent study has shown that aloe vera juice can reduce the symptoms of heartburn without any uncomfortable side effects.

Treats Constipation

Aloe vera juice contains several compounds known to act as laxatives. While drinking aloe vera juice is unlikely to cause digestive issues in people with normal bowel movements, it has shown promise as a way to relieve constipation.

May Improve IBS Symptoms

Aloe vera juice may be a potential treatment for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). This condition involves the inflammation of the intestine, leading to pain and other issues. Aloe has been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties. In one trial, people with IBS who drank aloe vera juice said some of their symptoms improved. However, scientists need to do more research. 

Nutrition

Aloe vera juice is a rich source of antioxidants, which help fight free radicals. This lowers oxidative stress on your body and reduces the risk of chronic conditions such as diabetes, heart disease, or even cancer. 

Aloe vera juice is also an excellent source of:

Nutrients per Serving 

One eight-ounce serving of pure aloe vera juice includes:

Aloe vera juice contains high levels of magnesium, which is a vital nutrient for nerve and muscle use. Magnesium helps your body with more than 300 different enzyme reactions, including those that regulate your blood pressure. It also helps regulate heart rhythm. 

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How to Prepare Aloe Vera Juice

Aloe vera juice can be found in supermarkets around the country. It typically comes in bottles, mixed with some water to make it less thick. 

It’s also possible to make aloe vera juice yourself. Take an aloe vera spike from a plant and trim the pointed edges off of the sides. Then, carefully slice off the skin on the flat side of the leaf and remove the gel from inside. This gel is the edible part of the plant.

Make sure you remove all traces of the skin from the plant. The skin adds a bitter, unpleasant flavor. You can rinse the gel under running water to help remove all traces of it. 

Once you have the gel, you can toss it in a blender. Blend it until smooth, then add water until it reaches the thickness you like. The result is a fresh, clean-tasting beverage.

Here are some ways to add aloe vera juice to your diet:

  • Drink the juice on its own.
  • Add aloe vera juice to smoothies.
  • Use aloe vera juice in cocktails.
  • Mix aloe vera juice into lemonade.
  • Use aloe vera juice in gelatin.
WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by Michael W. Smith, MD on August 06, 2020

Sources

SOURCES:

Clinical Interventions in Aging: “Nutrients for the Aging Eye.”

Dental Research Journal: “Evaluation of the therapeutic effects of Aloe vera gel on minor recurrent aphthous stomatitis.”

ESHA Research, Inc., Salem, Oregon.

Indian Journal of Dermatology: “Aloe Vera: A Short Review.”

Journal of Research in Medical Sciences: “Aloe vera in treatment of refractory irritable bowel syndrome: Trial on Iranian patients.”

Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine: “Efficacy and Safety of Aloe Vera Syrup for the Treatment of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: A Pilot Randomized Positive-Controlled Trial."

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health: “Aloe Vera.”

National Institutes of Health: “Magnesium.”

© 2020 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.

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