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How are strokes linked to obesity?

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Plaque that builds up in your arteries can break loose and act as blood clot, or embolus. As it travels through your bloodstream, it can cause other problems. If it lands in an artery in your heart, that’s a heart attack. If it gets too close to your brain, it can block the flow of oxygen. After just a few minutes without oxygen, brain cells begin to die, causing a stroke. The same things that help lower your chances of heart disease are also going to make a stroke less likely.

SOURCES:

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: “What Are the Health Risks of Overweight and Obesity?”

Mayo Clinic: “High Blood Pressure (Hypertension),” “Osteoarthritis,” “Gallstones.”

American Heart Association: “Coronary Artery Disease -- Coronary Heart Disease.”

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: “What is a Stroke?”

Cleveland Clinic: “Type 2 Diabetes.”

National Cancer Institute: “Uncovering the Mechanisms Linking Obesity and Cancer Risk.”

National Sleep Foundation: “Sleep Apnea.”

American Society for Reproductive Medicine: “Obesity and Reproduction: A Committee Opinion.”

 

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on August 09, 2018

SOURCES:

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: “What Are the Health Risks of Overweight and Obesity?”

Mayo Clinic: “High Blood Pressure (Hypertension),” “Osteoarthritis,” “Gallstones.”

American Heart Association: “Coronary Artery Disease -- Coronary Heart Disease.”

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: “What is a Stroke?”

Cleveland Clinic: “Type 2 Diabetes.”

National Cancer Institute: “Uncovering the Mechanisms Linking Obesity and Cancer Risk.”

National Sleep Foundation: “Sleep Apnea.”

American Society for Reproductive Medicine: “Obesity and Reproduction: A Committee Opinion.”

 

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on August 09, 2018

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Who is most at risk for type 2 diabetes?

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