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How can you get more fiber in your diet?

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  • Include fruits and vegetables and high-fiber whole grains at every meal and beans several times a week.
  • Snack on whole-grain crackers, fruit, vegetables, nuts and seeds (including natural-style nut butters) or popcorn (a whole grain).
  • Choose whole-grain breads and cereals, whole wheat pasta, and other whole grains, such as quinoa, millet, barley, cracked wheat, and wild rice.
  • Look for breads with more than 3 grams of fiber per slice. Go for cereals with 5 or more grams of dietary fiber per serving.
  • Start a meal with a bean soup, such as lentil or black bean.
  • Add canned, rinsed chickpeas, kidney beans or black beans to salads, soups, eggs, and pasta dishes.

SOURCES: Hillary M. Wright, MEd, RD, LDN, nutritionist, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston. Marisa Moore, RD, spokeswoman, Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. National Institute of Medicine. U. S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service. National Academies Press: "Dietary Reference Intakes for Energy, Carbohydrate, Fiber, Fat, Fatty Acids, Cholesterol, Protein, and Amino Acids;" "Dietary Reference Intakes for Calcium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Vitamin D, Fluoride;" "Dietary Reference Intakes for Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, and Choline;" "Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Selenium and Carotenoids;" "Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc;" and "Dietary Reference Intakes for Water, Potassium, Sodium and Chloride." National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements: "Iron" and "Vitamin D." Uptodate.com: “Patient information: High-fiber diet (Beyond the Basics),” Arnold Wald, MD.  








 

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on June 17, 2018

SOURCES: Hillary M. Wright, MEd, RD, LDN, nutritionist, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston. Marisa Moore, RD, spokeswoman, Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. National Institute of Medicine. U. S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service. National Academies Press: "Dietary Reference Intakes for Energy, Carbohydrate, Fiber, Fat, Fatty Acids, Cholesterol, Protein, and Amino Acids;" "Dietary Reference Intakes for Calcium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Vitamin D, Fluoride;" "Dietary Reference Intakes for Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, and Choline;" "Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Selenium and Carotenoids;" "Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc;" and "Dietary Reference Intakes for Water, Potassium, Sodium and Chloride." National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements: "Iron" and "Vitamin D." Uptodate.com: “Patient information: High-fiber diet (Beyond the Basics),” Arnold Wald, MD.  








 

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on June 17, 2018

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