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How can you get more potassium from your diet?

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These potassium-packed foods will help you meet your daily quota:

  • 1 cup canned kidney beans: 607 milligrams
  • 2 cups raw spinach: 839 mg
  • Medium sweet potato, cooked: 694 mg
  • 1 cup Greek yogurt: 240 mg
  • 1 cup orange juice: 496 mg
  • 1 cup cooked broccoli: 457 mg
  • 1 cup cantaloupe: 431 mg
  • 1 medium banana: 422 mg

SOURCES: Hillary M. Wright, MEd, RD, LDN, nutritionist, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston. Marisa Moore, RD, spokeswoman, Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. National Institute of Medicine. U. S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service. National Academies Press: "Dietary Reference Intakes for Energy, Carbohydrate, Fiber, Fat, Fatty Acids, Cholesterol, Protein, and Amino Acids;" "Dietary Reference Intakes for Calcium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Vitamin D, Fluoride;" "Dietary Reference Intakes for Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, and Choline;" "Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Selenium and Carotenoids;" "Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc;" and "Dietary Reference Intakes for Water, Potassium, Sodium and Chloride." National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements: "Iron" and "Vitamin D." Uptodate.com: “Patient information: High-fiber diet (Beyond the Basics),” Arnold Wald, MD.  








 

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on June 17, 2018

SOURCES: Hillary M. Wright, MEd, RD, LDN, nutritionist, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston. Marisa Moore, RD, spokeswoman, Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. National Institute of Medicine. U. S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service. National Academies Press: "Dietary Reference Intakes for Energy, Carbohydrate, Fiber, Fat, Fatty Acids, Cholesterol, Protein, and Amino Acids;" "Dietary Reference Intakes for Calcium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Vitamin D, Fluoride;" "Dietary Reference Intakes for Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, and Choline;" "Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Selenium and Carotenoids;" "Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc;" and "Dietary Reference Intakes for Water, Potassium, Sodium and Chloride." National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements: "Iron" and "Vitamin D." Uptodate.com: “Patient information: High-fiber diet (Beyond the Basics),” Arnold Wald, MD.  








 

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on June 17, 2018

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