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What are the pros and cons of using saccharin as a sugar substitute?

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Saccharin has been around since the late 1800s. It’s up to 500 times sweeter than table sugar and best known as Sweet’N Low.

In the 1970s, saccharin got a warning label after lab tests in rats suggested a possible link to bladder cancer. But the FDA now says the studies didn’t apply to humans and that saccharin is safe.

From: Stevia and Sugar Substitutes WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: “Aspartame.”

FDA: “Is Stevia an ‘FDA approved’ sweetener?” “What refined Stevia preparations have been evaluated by FDA to be used as a sweetener?” “Additional information about high-intensity sweeteners permitted for use in food in the United States.”

NYU Langone Medical Center: “Stevia.”

Harvard School of Public Health: “Artificial Sweeteners.”

Mayo Clinic: "Possible health benefits of sugar alcohols."

American Diabetes Association: "Sugar Alcohols."

Joslin Diabetes Center: “What are Sugar Alcohols?”

Center for Science in the Public Interest: “Sweet Nothings.”

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on February 16, 2019

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: “Aspartame.”

FDA: “Is Stevia an ‘FDA approved’ sweetener?” “What refined Stevia preparations have been evaluated by FDA to be used as a sweetener?” “Additional information about high-intensity sweeteners permitted for use in food in the United States.”

NYU Langone Medical Center: “Stevia.”

Harvard School of Public Health: “Artificial Sweeteners.”

Mayo Clinic: "Possible health benefits of sugar alcohols."

American Diabetes Association: "Sugar Alcohols."

Joslin Diabetes Center: “What are Sugar Alcohols?”

Center for Science in the Public Interest: “Sweet Nothings.”

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on February 16, 2019

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What are the pros and cons of using sucralose as a sugar substitute?

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