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What are the pros and cons of using stevia as a sugar substitute?

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Stevia is a no-calorie sweetener made from a South American plant. It's in sodas and sports drinks, and sold as tabletop packets, liquid drops, dissolvable tablets, and spoonable products. Those products are generally considered safe. Some people find that stevia can have a metallic aftertaste. Whole-leaf stevia or crude stevia extracts aren't FDA-approved.

From: Stevia and Sugar Substitutes WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: “Aspartame.”

FDA: “Is Stevia an ‘FDA approved’ sweetener?” “What refined Stevia preparations have been evaluated by FDA to be used as a sweetener?” “Additional information about high-intensity sweeteners permitted for use in food in the United States.”

NYU Langone Medical Center: “Stevia.”

Harvard School of Public Health: “Artificial Sweeteners.”

Mayo Clinic: "Possible health benefits of sugar alcohols."

American Diabetes Association: "Sugar Alcohols."

Joslin Diabetes Center: “What are Sugar Alcohols?”

Center for Science in the Public Interest: “Sweet Nothings.”

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on February 16, 2019

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: “Aspartame.”

FDA: “Is Stevia an ‘FDA approved’ sweetener?” “What refined Stevia preparations have been evaluated by FDA to be used as a sweetener?” “Additional information about high-intensity sweeteners permitted for use in food in the United States.”

NYU Langone Medical Center: “Stevia.”

Harvard School of Public Health: “Artificial Sweeteners.”

Mayo Clinic: "Possible health benefits of sugar alcohols."

American Diabetes Association: "Sugar Alcohols."

Joslin Diabetes Center: “What are Sugar Alcohols?”

Center for Science in the Public Interest: “Sweet Nothings.”

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on February 16, 2019

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What are the pros and cons of using acesulfame potassium (Acesulfame-K or Ace-K) as a sugar substitute?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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