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What are the risks of taking vitamin E?

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The risks and benefits of taking vitamin E are still unclear. Research has linked the use of vitamin E to an increase in hemorrhagic stroke.. In addition, an analysis of clinical trials found patients who took either synthetic vitamin E or natural vitamin E in doses of 400 IU per day -- or higher -- had an increased risk of dying from all causes, which seems to increase even more at higher doses. Cardiovascular studies also suggest that patients with diabetes or cardiovascular disease who take natural vitamin E at 400 IU per day have an increased risk of heart failure and heart failure-related hospitalization. Vitamin E supplements might be harmful when taken in early pregnancy. One study found that women who took vitamin E supplementation during the first eight weeks of pregnancy had a 1.7 to nine-fold increase in congenital heart defects. The exact amount of vitamin E supplements used by pregnant women in this study is unknown. A large population study showed that men using a multivitamin more than seven times per week in conjunction with a separate vitamin E supplement actually had a significantly increased risk of developing prostate cancer.

SOURCES:

Longe, J., ed. , second edition, 2004. The Gale Encyclopedia of Alternative Medicine

Natural Standard Patient Monograph: "Vitamin E."

Office of Dietary Supplement: "Vitamin E."

Tribble, D.L. , February 1999. Circulation

Miller, E.R. III , 2005. Annals of Internal Medicine

Lonn, E. 2005. Journal of the American Medical Association,

Hayden, K.M. 2007. The American Journal of Medicine,

Smedts, H.P. , 2009. BJOG

Lawson, K.A. , 2007. Journal of the National Cancer Institute

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on March 25, 2020

SOURCES:

Longe, J., ed. , second edition, 2004. The Gale Encyclopedia of Alternative Medicine

Natural Standard Patient Monograph: "Vitamin E."

Office of Dietary Supplement: "Vitamin E."

Tribble, D.L. , February 1999. Circulation

Miller, E.R. III , 2005. Annals of Internal Medicine

Lonn, E. 2005. Journal of the American Medical Association,

Hayden, K.M. 2007. The American Journal of Medicine,

Smedts, H.P. , 2009. BJOG

Lawson, K.A. , 2007. Journal of the National Cancer Institute

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on March 25, 2020

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What are the side effects of taking vitamin E?

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