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What is visceral fat?

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Visceral fat is fat that wraps around your abdominal organs deep inside your body. You can't always feel it or see it. In fact, you may have a pretty flat tummy and still have visceral fat. That's sometimes called TOFI, or Thin Outside Fat Inside.

Only an expensive scan can measure how much belly fat is hiding in you, but your doctor won't order a test just for that reason.

From: What Is Visceral Fat? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

British Journal of Radiology: “Comparison of 3 T MRI and CT for the measurement of visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue in humans,”

CDC: “Diabetes and Asian Americans,” “Knowing is Not Enough—Act on Your Family Health History,” “Body Mass Index (BMI).”

Cleveland Clinic: “Weight Management & Obesity,” “Physical Examination.”

Diabetes.co: “Visceral Fat (Active Fat).”

Endocrine Society: “Metabolic Risk Guideline Resources,” “The Dangers Of Visceral Fat.”

Harvard Health Publishing: “Taking aim at belly fat,” “Big thighs may be wise.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “The Skinny on Visceral Fat.”

Mayo Clinic: “Men's health: Checkups and screenings are key.”

Nutrition Journal: “The study of anthropometric estimates in the visceral fat of healthy individuals.”

The Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center: “Somatotypes.”

University of Houston Center For Wellness Without Borders: “The 3 Somatotypes.”

The American Journal of Medicine : “Upper Body Subcutaneous Fat Is Associated with Cardiometabolic Risk Factors.”

American Heart Association: “Trans Fats.”

The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition : “Calcium and vitamin D supplementation is associated with decreased abdominal visceral adipose tissue in overweight and obese adults.

Obesity (Silver Spring) : “Dietary calcium intake is associated with less gain in intra-abdominal adipose tissue over 1 yr.”

The Journal of Nutrition : “Greater Fructose Consumption Is Associated with Cardiometabolic Risk Markers and Visceral Adiposity in Adolescents.

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on August 26, 2019

SOURCES:

British Journal of Radiology: “Comparison of 3 T MRI and CT for the measurement of visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue in humans,”

CDC: “Diabetes and Asian Americans,” “Knowing is Not Enough—Act on Your Family Health History,” “Body Mass Index (BMI).”

Cleveland Clinic: “Weight Management & Obesity,” “Physical Examination.”

Diabetes.co: “Visceral Fat (Active Fat).”

Endocrine Society: “Metabolic Risk Guideline Resources,” “The Dangers Of Visceral Fat.”

Harvard Health Publishing: “Taking aim at belly fat,” “Big thighs may be wise.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “The Skinny on Visceral Fat.”

Mayo Clinic: “Men's health: Checkups and screenings are key.”

Nutrition Journal: “The study of anthropometric estimates in the visceral fat of healthy individuals.”

The Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center: “Somatotypes.”

University of Houston Center For Wellness Without Borders: “The 3 Somatotypes.”

The American Journal of Medicine : “Upper Body Subcutaneous Fat Is Associated with Cardiometabolic Risk Factors.”

American Heart Association: “Trans Fats.”

The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition : “Calcium and vitamin D supplementation is associated with decreased abdominal visceral adipose tissue in overweight and obese adults.

Obesity (Silver Spring) : “Dietary calcium intake is associated with less gain in intra-abdominal adipose tissue over 1 yr.”

The Journal of Nutrition : “Greater Fructose Consumption Is Associated with Cardiometabolic Risk Markers and Visceral Adiposity in Adolescents.

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on August 26, 2019

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How can you get rid of visceral or belly fat?

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