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Where in your body can you find digestive enzymes?

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Your saliva has digestive enzymes in it. Some of your organs, including your pancreas, gallbladder, and liver, also release them. Cells on the surface of your intestines store them, too.

From: What Are Digestive Enzymes? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

University of Rochester Medical Center: "Amylase (Blood)," "Lipase."

Winchester Health: "Proteolytic Enzymes."

PMC: "Digestive Enzyme Supplementation in Gastrointestinal Diseases."

MEDSURG Nursing: "Digestive Enzyme Replacement Therapy: Pancreatic Enzymes and Lactase."

Journal of Investigative Dermatology: "Papain Degrades Tight Junction Proteins of Human Keratinocytes In Vitro and Sensitizes C57BL/6 Mice via the Skin Independent of its Enzymatic Activity or TLR4 Activation."

Biotechnology Research International: "Properties and therapeutic application of bromelain: a review."

Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry: "Mango starch degradation. II. The binding of alpha-amylase and beta-amylase to the starch granule," "Amylolytic activity in fruits: comparison of different substrates and methods using banana as model." 

Journal of Food Science: "Characterization of honey amylase."

PLOS One: "What are the proteolytic enzymes of honey and what they do tell us? A fingerprint analysis by 2-D zymography of unifloral honeys."

Alternative Medicine Review: "The Role of Enzyme Supplementation in Digestive Disorders."

Journal of Nutrition & Food Sciences: "Study of the enzymes presents in Hass variety avocado."

Mayo Clinic: "Pancreatitis," "Pancreatic Cancer," "Cystic fibrosis," "Lactose intolerance."

NCBI: "The Central Role of Enzymes as Biological Catalysts."

Harvard Medical School, Harvard Health Letter: "Gut reaction: A Limited role for digestive enzyme supplements."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on November 07, 2019

SOURCES:

University of Rochester Medical Center: "Amylase (Blood)," "Lipase."

Winchester Health: "Proteolytic Enzymes."

PMC: "Digestive Enzyme Supplementation in Gastrointestinal Diseases."

MEDSURG Nursing: "Digestive Enzyme Replacement Therapy: Pancreatic Enzymes and Lactase."

Journal of Investigative Dermatology: "Papain Degrades Tight Junction Proteins of Human Keratinocytes In Vitro and Sensitizes C57BL/6 Mice via the Skin Independent of its Enzymatic Activity or TLR4 Activation."

Biotechnology Research International: "Properties and therapeutic application of bromelain: a review."

Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry: "Mango starch degradation. II. The binding of alpha-amylase and beta-amylase to the starch granule," "Amylolytic activity in fruits: comparison of different substrates and methods using banana as model." 

Journal of Food Science: "Characterization of honey amylase."

PLOS One: "What are the proteolytic enzymes of honey and what they do tell us? A fingerprint analysis by 2-D zymography of unifloral honeys."

Alternative Medicine Review: "The Role of Enzyme Supplementation in Digestive Disorders."

Journal of Nutrition & Food Sciences: "Study of the enzymes presents in Hass variety avocado."

Mayo Clinic: "Pancreatitis," "Pancreatic Cancer," "Cystic fibrosis," "Lactose intolerance."

NCBI: "The Central Role of Enzymes as Biological Catalysts."

Harvard Medical School, Harvard Health Letter: "Gut reaction: A Limited role for digestive enzyme supplements."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on November 07, 2019

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