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  • Question 1/11

    What percentage of coconut oil is fat?

  • Answer 1/11

    What percentage of coconut oil is fat?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Just like any oil, all of the calories come from fat. Coconut is a traditional staple of cooking in many countries. It’s used daily in some tropical cuisines and is popular with some diets.  There are 120 calories and 13 grams of fat in 1 tablespoon. That’s about the same amount as other plant-based oils like olive, canola, corn, and safflower.  

  • Question 1/11

    How much of coconut oil is saturated fat?

  • Answer 1/11

    How much of coconut oil is saturated fat?

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    • Correct Answer:

    Most vegetable oils are high in heart-healthy monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fats. But coconut oil is mostly saturated fat: 80% to 90%. Too much saturated fat, over time, can raise your odds of heart disease. The USDA says to get less than 10% of your calories from saturated fat. Need to lower your cholesterol level? The American Heart Association recommends limiting saturated fat to no more than 5% to 6% of your daily calories.

  • Question 1/11

    Coconut oil is the only plant oil with saturated fat.

  • Answer 1/11

    Coconut oil is the only plant oil with saturated fat.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    It’s not just in coconut oil. Palm oil and palm kernel oil also have saturated fats. Some people say that the type of saturated fat in coconut oil is better for your heart than that from animal products (like butter). But more research in people is needed to prove that.

  • Question 1/11

    Coconut oil is a good way to treat acne.

  • Answer 1/11

    Coconut oil is a good way to treat acne.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Even though it has antimicrobial properties, coconut oil isn’t a great zit zapper. It may clog your pores. This could give you even more pimples. A good treatment for acne is benzoyl peroxide or salicylic acid. Or you can try an antibiotic or retinoid if your acne is severe. Talk to your dermatologist about your options.

  • Question 1/11

    You can use coconut oil as a skin moisturizer.

  • Answer 1/11

    You can use coconut oil as a skin moisturizer.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Coconut oil is an emollient. That means it can act as a barrier to keep moisture in your skin. But some dermatologists caution against putting coconut oil on your face, especially if you have oily skin, because it may clog pores. Also, test a small patch on your skin first to make sure you won’t have an allergic reaction.

  • Question 1/11

    Coconut oil can prevent or treat Alzheimer’s disease.

  • Answer 1/11

    Coconut oil can prevent or treat Alzheimer’s disease.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    You may have heard claims that coconut oil can improve symptoms in people with Alzheimer’s disease. But there is no scientific evidence to support this claim. Experts don’t suggest using coconut oil to try to prevent or treat Alzheimer’s or other forms of dementia.

  • Question 1/11

    Don’t use coconut oil in the kitchen to:

  • Answer 1/11

    Don’t use coconut oil in the kitchen to:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Virgin coconut oil has a smoke point of about 350 degrees Fahrenheit. (It’s slightly higher for refined coconut oil.) You can use it to bake or sauté. But you shouldn’t deep fry anything in coconut oil. It may give off harmful chemicals if it heats up too much.

  • Question 1/11

    Coconut oil can condition your hair.    

  • Answer 1/11

    Coconut oil can condition your hair.    

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Coconut oil can get inside your hair shaft. Some research shows it may protect your hair from damage and protein loss if you put it on before and after you wash it.

  • Question 1/11

    Coconut oil can degrade the latex in condoms.

  • Answer 1/11

    Coconut oil can degrade the latex in condoms.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Although coconut oil is a natural lubricant, any product with oil can break down the latex in condoms. You should pick a water or silicone-based option if you use condoms to prevent pregnancy or STDs.

  • Answer 1/11

    Virgin coconut oil may help:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Virgin coconut oil, which is made from fresh coconut “meat,” may moisturize and soothe your skin if you have eczema or atopic dermatitis. The oil’s antimicrobial properties may also help protect your dry skin from infection.

  • Question 1/11

    You can use coconut oil to remove:

  • Answer 1/11

    You can use coconut oil to remove:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    You can dab some liquid coconut oil onto a cotton ball or cloth to take off your eye makeup. This is a natural way to take off any mascara, which might get in your eyes while you sleep.

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Sources | Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario, MD on August 27, 2019 Medically Reviewed on August 27, 2019

Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario, MD on
August 27, 2019

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

  1. PicturePartners / Getty Images

 

SOURCES:

Food Quality and Safety: “Coconut oil: what do we really know about it so far?”

Harvard Health Publishing, Harvard Medical School: “Cracking the coconut oil craze,” “Ask the doctor: Coconut oil and health.” 

Ghana Medical Journal: "Coconut oil and palm oil’s role in nutrition, health and national development: A review."

USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference: “Oil, coconut.”

American Heart Association: “Dietary Fats,” “The Skinny on Fats,” “Healthy Cooking Oils,” “Saturated fats: why all the hubbub over coconuts?” 

USDA ChooseMyPlate.gov: “What are “oils”?

FDA: “Saturated Fat.”

Current Nutrition Reports: “Are We Going Nuts on Coconut Oil?”

BMJ Open: “Randomised trial of coconut oil, olive oil or butter on blood lipids and other cardiovascular risk factors in healthy men and women.”

Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine: “Daily Consumption of Virgin Coconut Oil Increases High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Levels in Healthy Volunteers: A randomized Crossover Trial.”

Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine: “Oil pulling for maintaining oral hygiene – A review.”

Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research: “Comparative Evaluation of Antiplaque Efficacy of Coconut Oil Pulling and a Placebo, Among Dental College Students: A Randomized Controlled Trial.”

Journal of the Indian Society of Pedontics and Preventative Dentistry: “Effect of oil pulling on halitosis and microorganisms causing halitosis: a randomized controlled pilot trial.”

American Dental Association: “Oil Pulling.”

Northwestern Medicine: “Makeup Do’s and Dont’s,” “Better Hygiene for Healthy Eyes.” 

American Academy of Dermatology: “Saving face 101: How to customize your skin care routine with your skin type.”

Sarika Ramachandran, dermatologist; medical director, Yale Medicine.

Aisha Sethi, dermatologist, Yale Medicine.

Steve Xu, dermatologist; instructor, Northwestern Medicine Feinberg School of Medicine.

JAMA Dermatology: "Consumer Preferences, Product Characteristics, and Potentially Allergenic Ingredients in Best-selling Moisturizers.”

American Academy of Dermatology: “Saving face 101: How to customize your skin care routine with your skin type.”

Toxicology Mechanics and Methods: "Polyphenols of virgin coconut oil prevent pro-oxidant mediated cell death.”

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, The Nutrition Source: “Coconut Oil.”

BioMed Research International: “Improvement of Medium Chain Fatty Acid Content and Antimicrobial Activity of Coconut Oil via Solid-State Fermentation Using a Malaysian Geotrichum candidum.”

Open Heart: “Lauric acid-rich medium-chain triglycerides can substitute for other oils in cooking applications and may have limited pathogenicity.”

Neuroscience Letters: “Effects of a medium-chain triglyceride-based ketogenic formula on cognitive function in patients with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease.

Journal of the American College of Nutrition: “Health effects of Coconut Oil – A Narrative Review of Current Evidence.”

Alzheimer’s Society (UK): “Coconut oil and dementia.” 

Nutrition Reviews: “Coconut oil consumption and cardiovascular risk factors in humans.”

International Journal of Trichology: “Hair Cosmetics: An Overview.”

Kathleen Green, MD, University of Florida Health Women’s Center.

Pediatric Dermatology: “Use of “natural” oils for moisturization: Review of olive, coconut and sunflower seed oil.”

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.