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  • Question 1/10

    If you skip breakfast, you might be more likely to have:

  • Answer 1/10

    If you skip breakfast, you might be more likely to have:

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    Passing on breakfast can lead to weight gain, and that sets the stage for high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetes -- all of which can lead to heart disease. For a heart-healthy breakfast, skip the fatty bacon and sausage. Instead, load up on fresh fruit and whole grains.

  • Question 1/10

    What percentage of Americans skip breakfast?

  • Answer 1/10

    What percentage of Americans skip breakfast?

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    It may be known as the most important meal of the day, but fewer people eat a regular breakfast than they did 40 years ago. One reason for this may be that we eat more snacks these days, sometimes in place of meals.

  • Question 1/10

    Which food is better for fending off hunger? 

  • Answer 1/10

    Which food is better for fending off hunger? 

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    To curb cravings, get cracking. Eggs have protein, which takes your body longer to digest than the carbs in cereal and fruit. A high-protein breakfast can help you feel fuller for the rest of the day and may keep you from reaching for fatty snacks in the evening.

  • Question 1/10

    If you work out in the morning, you should eat breakfast:

  • Answer 1/10

    If you work out in the morning, you should eat breakfast:

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    • Correct Answer:

    Try to eat about an hour before you hit the gym. If you’re short on time, have a light meal that’s easy to digest, like a smoothie or yogurt. Fueling up first will give you energy to work out and keep you from feeling faint.

  • Question 1/10

    A morning meal can help you stay at a healthy weight.

  • Answer 1/10

    A morning meal can help you stay at a healthy weight.

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    Breakfast may keep you from overeating the rest of the day. Aim for a mix of whole grains, low-fat dairy, lean protein, and fruits and veggies. The combo of carbs, fiber, protein, and fat helps you stay full. Try a veggie-and-cheese omelet with whole wheat toast.

  • Answer 1/10

    Eating breakfast helps you:

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    • Correct Answer:

    Breakfast boosts your brainpower. Your brain runs on glucose, a type of sugar, and you’re low on this fuel when you first wake up. A morning meal can boost your memory, attention, focus, and alertness and help your performance at work or school. Case in point: Kids who have breakfast get better grades than those who don’t.

  • Question 1/10

    Breakfast does this to your metabolism:

  • Answer 1/10

    Breakfast does this to your metabolism:

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    Research shows that breakfast doesn’t change your metabolism at all, but the energy it gives you allows you to burn more calories throughout your day.

     

  • Question 1/10

    A morning meal makes you:

  • Answer 1/10

    A morning meal makes you:

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    Breakfast gives you energy -- not only does this make you more likely to exercise, but you also may tend to get up and move around in general. One study found that people who ate a morning meal burned 442 more calories through physical activity than those who skipped breakfast.

  • Question 1/10

    A morning meal makes you less likely to get type 2 diabetes.

  • Answer 1/10

    A morning meal makes you less likely to get type 2 diabetes.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    A healthy breakfast can keep your blood sugar steady, and over time, this can protect you from type 2 diabetes. One study shows that men who didn’t eat in the morning were 21% more likely to get the disease than those who did. Start your day with whole grains, such as oatmeal, cereal, or bread. They have fiber, which can also lower your diabetes risk.

  • Question 1/10

    How many grams of fiber should your cereal have per serving?

  • Answer 1/10

    How many grams of fiber should your cereal have per serving?

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    • Correct Answer:

    A bowl of cereal can be a smart way to start your day -- if you choose the right kind. High-fiber cereals can lower your risk of heart disease and diabetes. Look at the labels to make sure you’re getting a good amount of fiber -- and stay away from ones that have sugar among the first few ingredients.

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    Feeling foggy? Don’t forget to eat breakfast before you take a quiz like this.

Sources | Reviewed by Michael Dansinger, MD on March 13, 2019 Medically Reviewed on March 13, 2019

Reviewed by Michael Dansinger, MD on
March 13, 2019

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

1) Kraig Scarbinsky / Thinkstock

Sources:

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: “How to Fuel Your Workout.”

Advances in Nutrition: “The Benefits of Breakfast Cereal Consumption: A Systematic Review of the Evidence Base.”

American Heart Association: “Tips for Eating Breakfast.”

American Journal of Clinical Nutrition: “Eating Patterns and Type 2 Diabetes Risk in Men: Breakfast Omission, Eating Frequency, and Snacking.”

American Journal of Clinical Nutrition: “The Causal Role of Breakfast in Energy Balance and Health: A Randomized Controlled Trial in Lean Adults.”

Circulation: A Prospective Study of Breakfast Eating and Incident Coronary Heart Disease in a Cohort of Male U.S. Health Professionals

Circulation: Meal Timing and Frequency: “Implications for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.”

Early Human Development: “Regular Breakfast Consumption is Associated with Increased IQ in Kindergarten Children.”

European Journal of Clinical Nutrition: “Breakfast Skipping and Health-Compromising Behaviors in Adolescents and Adults.”

Frontiers in Human Neuroscience: “The Effects of Breakfast on Behavior and Academic Performance in Children and Adolescents.”

Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: “40-Year Trends in Meal and Snack Eating Behaviors of American Adults.”

Mayo Clinic: “Healthy Breakfast: Quick, Flexible Options.”

Mayo Clinic: “Eating and Exercise.”

Mayo Clinic: “Keep Your Breakfast Cereal Healthy.”

Obesity: “A High-Protein breakfast Prevents Body Fat Gain, Through Reductions in Daily Intake and Hunger, in ‘Breakfast Skipping’ Adolescents.”

Physiology & Behavior: “Effect of Breakfast Composition on Cognitive Processes in Elementary School Children.”

U.S. Department of Agriculture: “Breakfast Consumption, Body Weight, and Nutrient Intake: A Review of the Evidence.”

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.