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  • Question 1/14

    Less sleep makes you more hungry.

  • Answer 1/14

    Less sleep makes you more hungry.

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    • Correct Answer:

    When you’re short on ZZZs, your body’s systems get out of whack. It messes with the hormones that let you know you’re hungry and makes your body think it needs calories when it actually doesn’t.

  • Answer 1/14

    What makes you "hangry"?

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    "Hangry” is a combination of hungry and angry. Hunger stresses your body out. When your blood sugar dips, your body reacts with something called the “glucose counter-regulatory response.” This turns on stress hormones, and that sets you on edge.

  • Question 1/14

    What time of day is the typical person hungriest?

  • Answer 1/14

    What time of day is the typical person hungriest?

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    The hours you sleep tend to be the longest stretch you don’t eat, so you might think you’d crave food most right when you wake up. But scientists say your body actually wants more food just before you sleep. In part, it’s because your brain knows those calories need to last you through the night.

  • Question 1/14

    The parts of your stomach that send signals to your brain when you’re full are called:

  • Answer 1/14

    The parts of your stomach that send signals to your brain when you’re full are called:

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    • Correct Answer:

    These are triggered when -- you guessed it -- food or water stretches the lining of your stomach. This sends a message to your brain telling it your tummy’s full.

  • Answer 1/14

    This is a sign your hunger is emotional instead of physical.

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    • Correct Answer:

    When you have intense feelings, or even boredom, it’s common to distract yourself with food. Since it isn’t physical, food doesn’t really solve the problem, so you’re more likely to eat past the point of feeling full.

  • Answer 1/14

    Pictures of food:

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    Call it the power of suggestion: Studies show that when you see pictures of yummy food, the levels of ghrelin go up in your blood. It’s a hormone that makes you feel like it’s time to eat.  

  • Question 1/14

    You’re likely to eat more after studying than after relaxing because:

  • Answer 1/14

    You’re likely to eat more after studying than after relaxing because:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Believe it or not, you use about the same amount of energy to do calculus as to sit and chill on the couch. But using your noggin’ for mental work can make your insulin and glucose rise and fall, and that can ramp up your appetite.

  • Question 1/14

    A growling stomach is a sign of hunger.

  • Answer 1/14

    A growling stomach is a sign of hunger.

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    • Correct Answer:

    Your tummy “talks” all the time, for lots of different reasons. Sometimes it’s louder than others, but it’s not necessarily because you’re hungry. The noises you hear are your intestines tensing and relaxing to mix up the food, fluids, and gasses in your digestive system.

  • Question 1/14

    Which of these can increase your appetite?

  • Answer 1/14

    Which of these can increase your appetite?

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    When you have this, your thyroid gland is in overdrive. That revs up your metabolism  -- which can make you  feel hungry more often.

  • Question 1/14

    This makes you feel full longest:

  • Answer 1/14

    This makes you feel full longest:

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    • Correct Answer:

    You need all three as part of a healthy diet, but this sticks with you longer -- in part because it takes longer for your body to digest it. Fiber will make you feel full the fastest, but it doesn’t last as long.

  • Answer 1/14

    You think you’re hungry sometimes when you’re actually thirsty because:

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    Your hypothalamus steers the ship for both hunger and thirst. So sometimes your body thinks it wants a snack when it really needs water. Try a glass of it next time you feel like you need a nibble.

  • Question 1/14

    If you eat food really quickly, you’re more likely to eat:

  • Answer 1/14

    If you eat food really quickly, you’re more likely to eat:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Your brain can’t keep up with your mouth. The hormones that tell your brain you’ve had enough work best when eat slowly. If you scarf your meal, your brain doesn’t get the message until after you’ve eaten more than you need.

  • Question 1/14

    Drinking alcohol makes you eat more.

  • Answer 1/14

    Drinking alcohol makes you eat more.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Alcohol tells your brain to focus on food. Experts say that’s because it directs your hypothalamus to pay more attention to the smell of the food. So if you’re trying to cut calories, you might want to skip the pre-dinner cocktail.

  • Question 1/14

    Body fat affects how hungry you are.

  • Answer 1/14

    Body fat affects how hungry you are.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    If you have too little fat, you’re hungry more often. Your body has a “set point” for fat. It’s the amount you need to keep a constant, healthy weight. If you go below that, your body will feel hungry because it’s looking for more fat to bring you back to your baseline.

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Sources | Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, MS, DO on October 17, 2018 Medically Reviewed on October 17, 2018

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, MS, DO on
October 17, 2018

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

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SOURCES:

Medscape: “The Impact of Sleep Deprivation on Hormones and Metabolism.”

Schüssler, P. Obesity, 2012.

Porcellati, F. Diabetes, 2003.

Harvard Medical School: “The lowdown on thyroid slowdown.”

American Society of Clinical Oncology: “Stomach Cancer: Symptoms and Signs.”

American Academy of Family Physicians: “Hyperthyroidism.”

Scheer, F. Obesity, 2013.

Kids Health: “Emotional Eating.”

Chaput, J. Psychosomatic Medicine, 2008.

International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders: “A Noisy Tummy: What Does it Mean?”

Page, K. Journal of the American Medical Association, Jan. 2, 2013.

Harvard Medical School: “Why eating slowly may help you feel full faster,” “Extra protein is a decent dietary choice, but don’t overdo it.”

Coon, D. Psychology Today: A Modular Approach to Mind and Behavior, Tenth Edition, Thompson Learning, 2006.

Kokkinos, A. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, April 30, 2011.

Healthy Women: “Why Drinking Alcohol Makes You Hungry.”

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