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How can you get rectal prolapse from constipation?

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Your rectum, the final part of your large intestine, ends at your anus. When you’re constantly straining to pass stools, it can stretch and slip outside your body. Sometimes just part of the rectum comes out, but sometimes the whole thing does.

It can be painful and may cause bleeding. It can sometimes be hard to tell if you have rectal prolapse or hemorrhoids, since both cause bulging out of the anus, but they’re two different conditions that need to be treated differently.

SOURCES:

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Definition and facts of constipation,” “Definition and facts of hemorrhoids.”

Mayo Clinic: “Constipation,” “Hemorrhoids,” “Anal fissure.”

UCSF Medical Center: “Constipation Signs and Symptoms.”

The American Gastroenterological Association: “Understanding Constipation.”

Harvard Medical School: “Constipation and impaction.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Rectal Prolapse.”

Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology: “What is chronic constipation? Definition and diagnosis.”

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on January 31, 2019

SOURCES:

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Definition and facts of constipation,” “Definition and facts of hemorrhoids.”

Mayo Clinic: “Constipation,” “Hemorrhoids,” “Anal fissure.”

UCSF Medical Center: “Constipation Signs and Symptoms.”

The American Gastroenterological Association: “Understanding Constipation.”

Harvard Medical School: “Constipation and impaction.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Rectal Prolapse.”

Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology: “What is chronic constipation? Definition and diagnosis.”

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on January 31, 2019

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