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How is acute pancreatitis treated?

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People with acute pancreatitis are typically treated with IV fluids and pain medications in the hospital. In some patients, the pancreatitis can be severe and they may need to be admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU). In the ICU, the patient is closely watched because pancreatitis can damage the heart, lungs, or kidneys. Some cases of severe pancreatitis can result in death of pancreatic tissue. In these cases, surgery may be necessary to remove the dead or damaged tissue if an infection develops.

An acute attack of pancreatitis usually lasts a few days. An acute attack of pancreatitis caused by gallstones may require removal of the gallbladder or bile duct surgery. After the gallstones are removed and the inflammation goes away, the pancreas usually returns to normal.

From: What Is Pancreatitis? WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on September 15, 2019

Medically Reviewed on 9/15/2019

SOURCES:

Emedicine. 

National Pancreas Foundation. 

American Gastroenterological Association: ''Contrary to Popular Belief, Not All Cases of Chronic Pancreatitis are Alcohol- Induced.''  

National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse: ''Pancreatitis.''

 

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on September 15, 2019

SOURCES:

Emedicine. 

National Pancreas Foundation. 

American Gastroenterological Association: ''Contrary to Popular Belief, Not All Cases of Chronic Pancreatitis are Alcohol- Induced.''  

National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse: ''Pancreatitis.''

 

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on September 15, 2019

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