PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

How is peptic ulcer diagnosed?

ANSWER

Your doctor will ask about your symptoms, whether you take NSAIDs and other drugs, and medical history. She’ll also check you for bloating in the belly and pain. That may be enough to make a diagnosis.

The only way your doctor can tell for sure if you have an ulcer is to look. She may use a series of X-rays or a test called an endoscopy. This test allows her to pass a thin, bendy tube down your throat and into your stomach and small intestine. The tube has a camera at the end so she can check the lining for ulcers. She may also take a small piece of the lining to test for H. pylori. Blood, breath, and stool sample tests also can screen for the bacteria.

From: Peptic Ulcers (Stomach Ulcers) WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by William Blahd on September 27, 2017

Medically Reviewed on 9/27/2017

SOURCES:

UpToDate: “Patient education: Peptic ulcer disease (Beyond the Basics).”

American College of Gastroenterology: “Peptic Ulcer Disease.”

Medical University of South Carolina Digestive Disease Center: “Peptic Ulcers.”

Mayo Clinic: “Peptic Ulcer.”

CDC: “Helicobacter pylori.”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Peptic Ulcers.”

American Academy of Family Physicians: “Peptic Ulcer Disease.”

Reviewed by William Blahd on September 27, 2017

SOURCES:

UpToDate: “Patient education: Peptic ulcer disease (Beyond the Basics).”

American College of Gastroenterology: “Peptic Ulcer Disease.”

Medical University of South Carolina Digestive Disease Center: “Peptic Ulcers.”

Mayo Clinic: “Peptic Ulcer.”

CDC: “Helicobacter pylori.”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Peptic Ulcers.”

American Academy of Family Physicians: “Peptic Ulcer Disease.”

Reviewed by William Blahd on September 27, 2017

NEXT QUESTION:

How are peptic ulcers treated?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

    Other Answers On: