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What are anti-rejection medications?

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After the liver transplant, you will receive medications called immunosuppressants. These drugs slow or suppress your immune system to prevent it from rejecting the new liver.

Most transplant centers use either two of three agents. This typically involves a combination of a calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) such as cyclosporine (Neoral) or tacrolimus (Prograf), a glucocorticoid such as prednisone (Medrol, Prelone, Sterapred DS), and a third agent such as azathioprine (Imuran), mycophenolate mofetil (CellCept), sirolimus (Rapamune), or everolimus (Zortress, Afinitor). Once you achieve adequate liver function and are free from rejection for six months, ongoing immunosuppression can often be with a single drug, typically a CNI. You must take these drugs exactly as prescribed for the rest of your life.

From: Liver Transplantation WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCE: 

The American Liver Foundation. 

Sotiropoulos GC. 2009; 87(11): 1672-1680. Transplantation,

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on November 12, 2018

SOURCE: 

The American Liver Foundation. 

Sotiropoulos GC. 2009; 87(11): 1672-1680. Transplantation,

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on November 12, 2018

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When will I be able to go home after a liver transplant?

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