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What are medications for primary biliary cholangitis (PBC)?

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The main drug used to treat the disease is ursodeoxycholic acid, or UDCA. Your doctor might also call it ursodiol. It’s a natural bile acid that helps move bile out of your liver and into your small intestine.

If UDCA alone doesn’t help, or if you can't handle its side effects, your doctor may recommend obeticholic acid (Ocaliva). You might take it alone or along with UDCA. It boosts bile flow and eases how much bile acid your liver makes.

From: PBC: What Are Your Treatment Options? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Medscape: "Primary Biliary Cholangitis (Primary Biliary Cirrhosis) Treatment & Management."

Mayo Clinic: "Primary Biliary Cirrhosis: Treatment and drugs."

American Liver Foundation: "Primary Biliary Cholangitis (PBC, previously Primary Biliary Cirrhosis)."

American College of Gastroenterology: "Primary Biliary Cirrhosis (PBC)."

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: "Primary Biliary Cirrhosis."

HealthyWomen: "Primary Biliary Cholangitis (PBC) Diagnosis."

Reviewed by Arefa Cassoobhoy on December 06, 2017

SOURCES:

Medscape: "Primary Biliary Cholangitis (Primary Biliary Cirrhosis) Treatment & Management."

Mayo Clinic: "Primary Biliary Cirrhosis: Treatment and drugs."

American Liver Foundation: "Primary Biliary Cholangitis (PBC, previously Primary Biliary Cirrhosis)."

American College of Gastroenterology: "Primary Biliary Cirrhosis (PBC)."

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: "Primary Biliary Cirrhosis."

HealthyWomen: "Primary Biliary Cholangitis (PBC) Diagnosis."

Reviewed by Arefa Cassoobhoy on December 06, 2017

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What are treatments for itchy skin caused by primary biliary cholangitis (PBC)?

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