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What are peptic ulcers?

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Peptic ulcers are holes or breaks in the protective lining of the duodenum (the upper part of the small intestine) or the stomach -- areas that come into contact with stomach acids and enzymes. Duodenal ulcers are more common than stomach ulcers. Comparatively rare are esophageal ulcers, which form in the esophagus -- or swallowing tube -- and are often a result of exposure to medications, like certain antibiotics or anti-inflammatories, or alcohol abuse.

From: Understanding Ulcers WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: 

National institute of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Disease. 

American Gastroenterological Association. 

American Academy of Family Physicians. 

The Mayo Clinic.

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on April 2, 2017

SOURCES: 

National institute of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Disease. 

American Gastroenterological Association. 

American Academy of Family Physicians. 

The Mayo Clinic.

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on April 2, 2017

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What are some common misconceptions about peptic ulcers?

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