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When should I call my doctor about hemorrhoids?

ANSWER

If you think you have hemorrhoids, see your doctor. He can recommend treatment and make sure your symptoms are not caused by another condition.

You should also see your doctor if your hemorrhoids haven’t gotten better with treatment. You may need to see a doctor who specializes in hemorrhoids.

From: Digestive Health Tips WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: “It’s About Eating Right.”

AHRQ: “Treatment Options for GERD or Acid Reflux Disease: A Review of the Research for Adults.”

American Academy of Family Physicians: “Antidiarrheal Medicines: OTC Relief for Diarrhea.”

American Academy of Family Physicians: “Heartburn.”

American College of Gastroenterology: “Acid Reflux.”

American College of Gastroenterology: “Probiotics for the Treatment of Adult Gastrointestinal Disorders.”

American Family Physician: “Effective management of flatulence.”

American Gastroenterological Association: “Understanding Heartburn and Reflux Disease.”

American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy: “Understanding Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.”

American Society of Health-System Pharmacists: “Cimetidine.”

Brahm, N. , April 2011. The Consultant Pharmacist

Canadian Society of Intestinal Research: “Exercise helps pass gas.”

Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh: “Organs: small and large intestine.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Constipation.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Diarrhea.”

Cleveland Clinic: “The Fiber Lifestyle.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Gas.”

Cleveland Clinic: “GERD.”

Cleveland Clinic: “GERD and Asthma.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Heartburn.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Heartburn Treatment.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Hemorrhoids.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Probiotics.”

FDA: “Possible Increased Risk of Bone Fractures with Certain Antacid Drugs.”

Harvard School of Public Health: “Fiber.”

Harvard Health: “Hemorrhoids and what to do about them.”

Hye-kyung J. , January 2010. Journal of Neurogastroenterol Motility

International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders: “Exercise & GI Symptoms.”

Katz, P. , 2013. American Journal of Gastroenterology

National Institutes of Health: “Gas in the Digestive Tract.”

National Institutes of Health: “Hemorrhoids.”

National Institutes of Health: “Symptoms and Causes of Constipation.”

National Institutes of Health: “Your digestive system and how it works.”

NHLBI: “What are the symptoms of a heart attack?”

NIDDK: “Gastroesophageal Reflux (GER) and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) in Adults.”

Thompson, W. International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders.

Reviewed by Jaydeep Bhat on February 14, 2019

SOURCES:

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: “It’s About Eating Right.”

AHRQ: “Treatment Options for GERD or Acid Reflux Disease: A Review of the Research for Adults.”

American Academy of Family Physicians: “Antidiarrheal Medicines: OTC Relief for Diarrhea.”

American Academy of Family Physicians: “Heartburn.”

American College of Gastroenterology: “Acid Reflux.”

American College of Gastroenterology: “Probiotics for the Treatment of Adult Gastrointestinal Disorders.”

American Family Physician: “Effective management of flatulence.”

American Gastroenterological Association: “Understanding Heartburn and Reflux Disease.”

American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy: “Understanding Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.”

American Society of Health-System Pharmacists: “Cimetidine.”

Brahm, N. , April 2011. The Consultant Pharmacist

Canadian Society of Intestinal Research: “Exercise helps pass gas.”

Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh: “Organs: small and large intestine.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Constipation.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Diarrhea.”

Cleveland Clinic: “The Fiber Lifestyle.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Gas.”

Cleveland Clinic: “GERD.”

Cleveland Clinic: “GERD and Asthma.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Heartburn.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Heartburn Treatment.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Hemorrhoids.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Probiotics.”

FDA: “Possible Increased Risk of Bone Fractures with Certain Antacid Drugs.”

Harvard School of Public Health: “Fiber.”

Harvard Health: “Hemorrhoids and what to do about them.”

Hye-kyung J. , January 2010. Journal of Neurogastroenterol Motility

International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders: “Exercise & GI Symptoms.”

Katz, P. , 2013. American Journal of Gastroenterology

National Institutes of Health: “Gas in the Digestive Tract.”

National Institutes of Health: “Hemorrhoids.”

National Institutes of Health: “Symptoms and Causes of Constipation.”

National Institutes of Health: “Your digestive system and how it works.”

NHLBI: “What are the symptoms of a heart attack?”

NIDDK: “Gastroesophageal Reflux (GER) and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) in Adults.”

Thompson, W. International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders.

Reviewed by Jaydeep Bhat on February 14, 2019

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