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  • Question 1/8

    Ulcerative colitis is also known as Crohn’s disease and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

  • Answer 1/8

    Ulcerative colitis is also known as Crohn’s disease and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    They're three separate disorders that share some symptoms. Ulcerative colitis is a type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in the large intestine (colon) and rectum. It causes diarrhea, belly pain, and irritation and sores on the intestine wall. Crohn’s disease is also an IBD, but can affect any part of the digestive tract. IBS can be very uncomfortable, but it doesn't harm your intestine's lining.

  • Question 1/8

    If you have celiac disease, it's fine to use shampoos and lotions that have gluten in them.

  • Answer 1/8

    If you have celiac disease, it's fine to use shampoos and lotions that have gluten in them.

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    • Correct Answer:

    Some people get a type of celiac disease called dermatitis herpetiformis, which causes an itchy rash. But it’s caused by eating gluten, not by getting it on your skin. It’s safe to use gluten-containing products such as sunscreens, shampoos, and lotions. Avoid lipstick with gluten, though. You might accidentally swallow some.

  • Question 1/8

    If you didn't poop today, you’re probably constipated.

  • Answer 1/8

    If you didn't poop today, you’re probably constipated.

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    • Correct Answer:

    Some people poop every day, but some need to less often. You’re constipated if you have less than three bowel movements a week for about 3 weeks. You might also be constipated if you poop more than that, but:

    • Your BMs are very hard or very small.
    • You spend a lot of time straining.
    • You feel like your bowels aren’t empty after you go.
  • Question 1/8

    What’s the leading cause of liver disease in the U.S.?

  • Answer 1/8

    What’s the leading cause of liver disease in the U.S.?

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    • Correct Answer:

    About 1 in 10 people in the U.S. have what's called nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. It happens when fat tissues build up in your liver and cause inflammation. Your risk for it goes up if you’re overweight. The best treatment is weight loss. But don't go on a crash diet. Losing more than 3½ pounds a week can actually make it worse.

  • Question 1/8

    What’s the best way to prevent diverticulitis flare-ups?

  • Answer 1/8

    What’s the best way to prevent diverticulitis flare-ups?

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    • Correct Answer:

    Diverticula are small pouches that form in the lower part of your colon. They can get inflamed, a condition called diverticulitis. Straining when you poop can make it worse. High-fiber foods like fruits, veggies, and whole grains help keep stools soft, so they pass easily. Seeds and nuts have not been shown to worsen diverticulitis. You need surgery only if you have major complications. Most people don’t.

  • Question 1/8

    You can have hemorrhoids and not know you have them.

  • Answer 1/8

    You can have hemorrhoids and not know you have them.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Hemorrhoids are very common -- 3 out of 4 adults get them at some point. They're basically swollen veins around your anus. External ones are in the skin around your butt, and they may cause itching, pain, and swelling. But internal hemorrhoids happen inside your rectum, so you usually can’t see or feel them. Don't worry. You need medical treatment for hemorrhoids only if you have symptoms.

  • Question 1/8

    Heartburn and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are the same thing.

  • Answer 1/8

    Heartburn and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are the same thing.

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    • Correct Answer:

    Heartburn is a symptom of GERD. This condition causes stomach acid to flow backward into your esophagus, the tube that connects your throat to your stomach. That creates a burning feeling in your chest -- heartburn. You can have heartburn without GERD. But if you have it more than twice a week, talk to your doctor.

  • Question 1/8

    Gallstones can grow as big as a golf ball.

  • Answer 1/8

    Gallstones can grow as big as a golf ball.

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    • Correct Answer:

    Your gallbladder is a small organ below your liver that stores bile, a liquid that helps you digest food. Sometimes, the bile hardens into "stones," which can be tiny or up to golf ball-size. Often, they don't need any treatment. But if they block your bile ducts -- tubes that carry bile from the liver to the small intestine -- you may need to get your gallbladder removed.

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Sources | Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson, MD on March 27, 2020 Medically Reviewed on March 27, 2020

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson, MD on
March 27, 2020

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

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SOURCES:

Cedars-Sinai: "Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)."

Mayo Clinic: "Celiac disease: Can gluten be absorbed through the skin?" "Hemorrhoids," "Acid Reflux & GERD: The Same Thing?" "Gallstones."

UpToDate: "Patient education: Constipation in adults (Beyond the Basics)," "Patient education: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), including nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) (Beyond the Basics)," "Patient education: Diverticular disease (Beyond the Basics)," "Patient education: Gallstones (Beyond the Basics)," "Patient education: Irritable Bowel Syndrome."

Cleveland Clinic: "IBD and IBS: Q&A," "The Best & Worst Foods for IBS."

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.