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Most voted positive review

5 People found this comment helpful

I was using Copaxone for years and switched to Glatopa a few months ago. I have not had any negative effects with Glatopa. I have great insurance so cost didn't drive my decision to switch. I just would like to see Teva go out of business for over charging AND stifling healthy competition that leads to innovative breakthroughs. When I switched to Glatopa, I was told that I would have to use thei...

Most voted negative review

1 People found this comment helpful

For what it's worth, I would not recommend switching to Glatopa yet (as it's still too new in the market). I was on Copaxone for 5 years and was doing great before the switch. Had I known what I know now, I would have opted for the alternative Copaxone financial assistance (a reimbursement program) to stay on the daily shot once Kaiser auto-switched patients to Glatopa (for cost saving purposes to...

Shared reviews and ratings

AK MS | 55-64 | Female | On medication for 10 years or more | Patient
1/1/2020
Condition: Relapsing Form of Multiple Sclerosis
Overall rating 1.0
Effectiveness
Ease of Use
Satisfaction

I can't thank all of you enough for sharing your experiences!! I learned from my pharmacy last week that my insurer Premera Blue Cross of Alaska will no longer cover my Copaxone until I try Glatopa. I have been struggling with whether or not to do this, but these posts have convinced me it is not worth it. I have been on Copaxone since diagnosis in Mar 2006 and have been 100% stable! Occassional fatigue, but no relapses (I was initially diagnosed due to optic neuritis) and no worsening of any symptoms. I am able to live a completely normal life. The price of my monthly prescription dropped like a rock in Dec 2018 from $6,500 to $1,800, which proves what I had long suspected that Teva was price gouging, but no amount of money is worth to me risking future lesions. Those aren't fixable. I feel so very blessed to have found a medication that effectively treats this disease for me!! And scared to death to try experimenting with a new unknown. And all of your comments have confirmed my suspicions. Glatopa may be largely the same formulation, but it is not an exact replacement that will produce the same results. I can see cost being a factor for insurers, but from what I've been able to find, the cost of Glatopa is very close to Copaxone. Whereas the cost of treatment for further disease progression symptoms, and/or an MRI to determine effectiveness are exhorbitantly expensive. So where is the cost savings? Again than you all so much for sharing your experiences. I am so sorry your "forced" trials (experiments!) have cost you declines in precious health that can't be recovered. P.S. I only gave a rating because it is required. I have no actual experience with Glatopa.) Read More Read Less

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JLD | 35-44 | Female | On medication for 1 to 6 months | Patient
4/20/2019
Condition: Relapsing Form of Multiple Sclerosis
Overall rating 1.3
Effectiveness
Ease of Use
Satisfaction

I was completely stable on Copaxone for years, with no progression, until Cigna made me switch to Glatopa. After several weeks on Glatopa I began having severe symptoms, including numbness and tingling in my extremities, difficulty using my hands, clumsiness in one foot, and difficulty thinking. I am afraid and wish I had never tried this drug.

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Dan | 45-54 | Male | On medication for 1 to less than 2 years | Patient
2/23/2019
Condition: Relapsing Form of Multiple Sclerosis
Overall rating 1.3
Effectiveness
Ease of Use
Satisfaction

I was on copaxone for about 7 years. No increases in legions during that time. My insurance forced me to switch to generic. After 1 year on generic, legions more than doubled on brain and quadrupled on spine. Doctor immediately switched me to Gilenya. 1 year later, no advancement in legions or worsening of pain and fatigue. Thought it was just my time to get worse until looking into it again and seeing like issues.

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Mjmaresp | 55-64 | Female | On medication for 1 to 6 months | Patient
10/27/2018
Condition: Relapsing Form of Multiple Sclerosis
Overall rating 1.0
Effectiveness
Ease of Use
Satisfaction

I had multiple side effects. Most concerning was it impacted my ability to process information memory problems and depression. In addition multiple small joint pain and fatigue. I had NO side effect problems with Copaxone and had to return to Copaxone. They are NOT comparable medications.

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deputy dawgg!! | 55-64 | On medication for 1 to less than 2 years | Patient
8/16/2017
Condition: Relapsing Form of Multiple Sclerosis
Overall rating 1.0
Effectiveness
Ease of Use
Satisfaction

don't like it at all the support is not there at all when I was on the copaxone .I got phone calls to check to make sure the medicine/theapy was workin anything I needed they were there to help.

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BP | 55-64 | Female | On medication for 6 months to less than 1 year | Patient
7/23/2017
Condition: Relapsing Form of Multiple Sclerosis
Overall rating 1.3
Effectiveness
Ease of Use
Satisfaction

During the 20 years that I was injecting Copaxone 20 mg daily, I had no further disease activity or relapses of my MS. However, when the generic Glatopa was approved, my insurance company required me to either switch to Glatopa, or pay the difference between the cost of the generic Glatopa and Copaxone, which in my case was $1640 per month. Within 9 months of switching to Glatopa, I had my first relapse in 20 years. I lost coordination and fine motor skills in my left hand, and a new lesion appeared on an MRI of my spine. My clinical and MRI data demonstrate a clear generic Glatopa failure. After the failure of Glatopa, I was switched back to Copaxone and my MS has stabilized with no further relapses. Glatopa is not identical in effectiveness to Copaxone. Generic failure is simply not acceptable.Read More Read Less

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Tashia | 45-54 | On medication for 6 months to less than 1 year | Patient
3/15/2017
Condition: Relapsing Form of Multiple Sclerosis
Overall rating 1.0
Effectiveness
Ease of Use
Satisfaction

For what it's worth, I would not recommend switching to Glatopa yet (as it's still too new in the market). I was on Copaxone for 5 years and was doing great before the switch. Had I known what I know now, I would have opted for the alternative Copaxone financial assistance (a reimbursement program) to stay on the daily shot once Kaiser auto-switched patients to Glatopa (for cost saving purposes to them) without ensuring the negative side effects to patients because basically they just don't care. All that being said, within 6 months of switching to Glatopa, I ended up in the hospital with Transverse Myelitis for 10 days (with a 100K hospital bill) which is more than a relapse it's a completely new lesion on the spine. Anyway, while in the hospital a doctor told me that a generic does not have to be exactly the same ingredients as their predecessor. She said the generic drug can contain up to 20% of new proprietary ingredients). Wish I had known. It's unbelievable that Kaiser (or any doctor) would just switch patients to a new drug without that full disclosure or before the medication has been truly tested as a genuine safe replacement. I have since been referred to MS Center (where they don't recommend Glatopa - go figure). My new doctor (at MS Center) put me on Tysabri - which I hear is the "cadillac" of current MS treatments. Anyway, been doing fine on it so far with the exception of lingering nerve discomfort from the Glatopa relapse (for which I also take Gabapentin). After all is said and done, I have learned to put my faith and trust in God and by his Grace I am doing quite amazing all things considered. Soon I will be back 100% and in the meantime...All is well!Read More Read Less

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Ujndf2 | 55-64 | On medication for 1 to less than 2 years | Patient
2/8/2017
Condition: Relapsing Form of Multiple Sclerosis
Overall rating 1.0
Effectiveness
Ease of Use
Satisfaction

I have been on Glatopa since 9-15. I am a 63 year old male. I have been on disability since 10-12. Walmart wanted $7,000.00 per month for copaxone,so I went on Glatopa. I live in Florida and the summers are really bad on me. I experience extreme fatigue doing any type of activity that anyone else could do with ease. Winter is much kinder to me but I still go through a lesser severe fatigue. I do not believe that Glatopa helps.

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Braeun6 | 35-44 | Male | On medication for 1 to 6 months | Patient
4/29/2016
Condition: Relapsing Form of Multiple Sclerosis
Overall rating 2.3
Effectiveness
Ease of Use
Satisfaction

Joining what seems to be a growing chorus of folks and growing pattern of stories. I too was on Copaxone since 2007 and had excellent results at 5 year MRI, and only two minor relapses that remitted within days and required no additional medication (steroids). Insurance bumped me to Glatopa in Jan 16 and by March I had uvitis, and by April (present) I am having a flare up (numb, cramped feet and weak legs) that has persisted for over a week and is not responding to prednisone.

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betti67 | 45-54 | On medication for 1 to 6 months | Patient
3/15/2016
Condition: Relapsing Form of Multiple Sclerosis
Overall rating 2.0
Effectiveness
Ease of Use
Satisfaction

I was diagnosed in September 2003 with RRMS. All those years i was getting Copaxone and was happy with its effectiveness. Fatigue and occasional eye problems, nothing horribly crazy. Now, I have been on Glatopa for about 3 months (my Dr. explained that the insurance safes 50% with Glatopa, its all about the $$) and pretty much from the 2nd month on I am experiencing eye problems daily, feel lightheaded and today even felt weakness in my legs and arms, just for a short time, however I have never had problems like that with Copaxone. Read More Read Less

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Phil Morris | 45-54 | Male | On medication for 5 to less than 10 years | Patient
1/1/2016
Condition: Relapsing Form of Multiple Sclerosis
Overall rating 5.0
Effectiveness
Ease of Use
Satisfaction

I was using Copaxone for years and switched to Glatopa a few months ago. I have not had any negative effects with Glatopa. I have great insurance so cost didn't drive my decision to switch. I just would like to see Teva go out of business for over charging AND stifling healthy competition that leads to innovative breakthroughs. When I switched to Glatopa, I was told that I would have to use their Sandoz auto-injector. The Sandoz company promptly sent me their auto-injector kit for free, nice folks they are:) What I ultimately found is the Glatopa glass syringes work just fine with the Auto2 Injector that I'd been using for years and very accustom to. I haven't notice any less effectiveness with Glatopa and I would because when I have a flair up, it's usually in the form of optic neuritis. Now that that Israel's Teva strangle hold on Copaxone generics in the United States is no longer, (Teva even tried to sue the FDA in hopes of keeping their Copaxone strangle hold, Teva lost) I'm hoping that other big pharma vendors get into manufacturing high quality Copaxone generics and even develop more highly effective MS treatments. Read More Read Less

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crazy8 | 35-44 | Female | Patient
12/30/2015
Condition: Relapsing Form of Multiple Sclerosis
Overall rating 1.0
Effectiveness
Ease of Use
Satisfaction

I was on Copaxone for 4 years without a noticeable flare up. After being switched to Glatopa about 3 months ago I now have lost feeling in my left arm and the left side of my face. I'm also having more difficulty injecting and more injection reactions. I gave up on their injector and now just use my old Copaxone one.

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pete1121 | 45-54 | On medication for 1 to 6 months | Patient
12/12/2015
Condition: Relapsing Form of Multiple Sclerosis
Overall rating 1.0
Effectiveness
Ease of Use
Satisfaction

I was moved to this generic Glatopa after 12 years on Copaxone. Few attacks maybe one minor numbness some fatigue. now on Glatopa after 3 months, going through my second attack of the year. first one I lost my hearing in my left ear. now I am having trouble with my legs weak trouble walking. no happy with Glatopa.

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Bula | 45-54 | Female | On medication for 1 to 6 months | Patient
10/1/2015
Condition: Relapsing Form of Multiple Sclerosis
Overall rating 2.0
Effectiveness
Ease of Use
Satisfaction

I was changed to this generic form from my insurance about 3 mo ago. I have been even more tired starting a month ago and I have started forgetting important things such as appointments and conversations. I will be seeing a doctor soon for this.

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