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How can exercise help with treating pulmonary embolism (PE)?

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Most people can walk and do light housework right away after a pulmonary embolism, but you may get tired easily or feel short of breath.

Your doctor probably will give you specific exercises to do for several weeks or months to help boost your strength and breathing. Follow those recommendations, but don’t push yourself, especially if anything hurts or you notice any swelling.

SOURCES:

National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute: “Pulmonary Embolism.”

Society for Vascular Surgery: “Pulmonary Embolism.”

American Heart Association: “What are anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents?”

American Lung Association: “Living with DVT / Blood clots.”

NYU Langone Health: “Recovery & Support for Pulmonary Embolism.”

Chest: “Functional and Exercise Limitations After a First Episode of Pulmonary Embolism.”

Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis : “Quality of life after pulmonary embolism.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Surgical Thrombectomy.”

University of North Carolina: “FAQ: When can I resume physical activities?”

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on March 25, 2018

SOURCES:

National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute: “Pulmonary Embolism.”

Society for Vascular Surgery: “Pulmonary Embolism.”

American Heart Association: “What are anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents?”

American Lung Association: “Living with DVT / Blood clots.”

NYU Langone Health: “Recovery & Support for Pulmonary Embolism.”

Chest: “Functional and Exercise Limitations After a First Episode of Pulmonary Embolism.”

Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis : “Quality of life after pulmonary embolism.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Surgical Thrombectomy.”

University of North Carolina: “FAQ: When can I resume physical activities?”

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on March 25, 2018

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How can compression stockings help with treating pulmonary embolism (PE)?

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