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How can you prevent deep vein thrombosis (DVT)?

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Simple lifestyle changes may help lower your odds of developing deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Try these simple tips to keep your blood circulating like it should:

  • Take care of yourself. Stop smoking, lose weight, and get active.
  • Get regular check-ups. If your doctor has prescribed a medicine to control a health problem, take it as directed. Don’t sit for too long. If you’re traveling for 4 hours or more, take breaks to flex and stretch your lower leg muscles. If you’re on a flight, walk up and down the aisle every half hour. On long car drives, pull over each hour to stretch. Wear loose-fitting clothes and drink plenty of water.
  • Plan surgery after-care. Talk to your doctor about what you can do to prevent DVT after surgery. She might suggest you wear compression stockings or take blood thinners. You’ll also want to get out of bed and start moving around.

From: Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: “Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT).”

Mayo Clinic: “Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT).”

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: “Explore Deep Vein Thrombosis.”

Clot Connect/UNC Blood Clot Outreach Program: “Symptoms, Risk Factors and Prevention.”

University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC HealthBeat): “Could You Be at Risk of Developing Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT)?”

American Heart Association: “Understand Your Risk for Excessive Blood Clotting.”

NHS: “Causes of Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT),” “Pregnancy and Baby: Deep Vein Thrombosis.”

University of Michigan Health System: “Inferior Vena Cava (IVC) Filters.”

Anderson, F., Audet, A. Center for Outcomes Research: University of Massachusetts Medical School.

Reviewed by James Beckerman on July 5, 2018

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: “Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT).”

Mayo Clinic: “Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT).”

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: “Explore Deep Vein Thrombosis.”

Clot Connect/UNC Blood Clot Outreach Program: “Symptoms, Risk Factors and Prevention.”

University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC HealthBeat): “Could You Be at Risk of Developing Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT)?”

American Heart Association: “Understand Your Risk for Excessive Blood Clotting.”

NHS: “Causes of Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT),” “Pregnancy and Baby: Deep Vein Thrombosis.”

University of Michigan Health System: “Inferior Vena Cava (IVC) Filters.”

Anderson, F., Audet, A. Center for Outcomes Research: University of Massachusetts Medical School.

Reviewed by James Beckerman on July 5, 2018

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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